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Stargate (the movie)




Theatrical release October 28, 1994

Length 116 minutes

Written by Dean Devlin and Roland Emmerich

Directed by Roland Emmerich

Starring Kurt Russell as Colonel Jonathan 'Jack' O'Neil, James Spader as Dr. Daniel Jackson, Jaye Davidson as Ra, Viveca Lindfors as Catherine Langford, Alexis Cruz as Skaara, Mili Avital as Sha'uri, Leon Rippy as General W.O. West, and John Diehl as Lieutenant Kawalsky.

Back in 1928, Catherine Langford's father unearths a huge circular object protected by stones covered in hieroglyphs. In 1994 Dr. Daniel Jackson, a discredited Egyptologist, is asked to help translate the symbols, some of which don't resemble any known language.

Jackson determines that the unidentified symbols are an address or pathway to another star system. The address is dialed into the Stargate and a stable wormhole forms. A probe is sent through, showing that there is breathable air and another stargate.

Jackson, Colonel O'Neil, and the rest, step through the Stargate to Abydos, a desert planet. They are inside a pyramid. They meet the locals. Soon, Ra arrives, landing his ship on top of the pyramid and causing havoc.

Quite a few things are not well explained in this movie. What happened to the Stargate between 1924 and 1994? How did they know how to power the Stargate? Why did they think the energy field would lead to anything except destruction? The Abydos Stargate is located inside a roomy and defensible pyramid. Why set up camp outside in the hot sun? How do so many people live on and work in an area with almost no vegetation or water sources?

Although Kurk Russell, as Jack O'Neil, gets top billing, this is Daniel Jackson's story. James Spader does a believable job of portraying Jackson as an intuitive genius, who is sometimes socially clueless.

Once Ra arrives, glowing eyes and all, the action starts. There are battles and fight scenes and a nail-biting conclusion. There even a bit of a love story.

This is a great stand-alone film, but it is also the beginning of the Stargate SG1 television series. The television series features many of the characters from the movie, some played by the same actors. Most of the personalities are similar.

Jack O'Neil is the exception. Kurt Russell's portrayal of Jack O'Neil is vastly different from Richard Dean Anderson's portrayal of Jack O'Neill. Even the name is spelled differently.

Reviewed by Roman a Drew July 4, 2020









The Goa'uld
Season 1










Children of the Gods - Final Cut (2009)


Season 1, Episodes 1 & 2

Directed by Mario Azzopardi, Written by Jonathan Glassner & Brad Wright

Originally aired July 27, 1997

Starring Richard Dean Anderson as Colonel Jack O'Neill, Michael Shanks as Dr. Daniel Jackson, Amanda Tapping as Captain Samantha Carter, Christopher Judge as Teal'c, Don S. Davis as Major General George Hammond, and Gary Jones as Sgt. Walter Harriman.

With Jay Acovone as Major Charles Kawalsky, Vaitiare Hirshon as Sha're/Amaunet, Robert Wisden as Samuels, Peter Williams as Apophis, Brent Stait as Louis Ferretti, Alexis Cruz as Skaara/Klorel, and Rachel Hayward as Sargent Carol Weterings

A year after the incident on Abydos, inside Cheyenne Mountain Complex, a few soldiers play cards in front of the Stargate, which is covered in a tarp. The tarp blows off and a wormhole forms, scaring everyone. A ball rolls through, followed by Apophis and his goons. They kill the men and grab Sgt. Carol Weterings, the only woman. Then they march back through the Stargate taking her with them - more about that later.

Jack is recalled from retirement, again. General Hammond wants to send another nuke through the gate to Abydos. To prevent that, Jack fesses up and tells him that Daniel is still alive, and there are thousands of innocent people on Abydos. The team goes to Abydos to find the Goa'uld, who attacked the complex.

Of course, Apophis isn't on Abydos. Daniel is, as is his wife, Sha're, and Jack's friend, Skaara. But it isn't long before Apophis shows up and wreaks havoc.

Children of the Gods sets up the series. The Goa'uld are evil looking wormy parasites that control their hosts. SG1 consists of Daniel, the gentle the geek, Sam, the scientist, Jack, the military mind, and Teal'c, the muscle who knows the enemy. Thanks to Daniel, they now also have hundreds of gate addresses to try.

Showtime broadcast Children of the Gods as two episodes shown back to back. In 2009, the two episodes were combined into one movie, Children of the Gods - Final Cut. Final Cut is tightly edited and moves along without a dull moment. It has a complex plot and excellent character development. Michael Shanks copies James Spader's Daniel. But Richard Dean Anderson's Jack is much more likable than Kurt Russell's.

I watched Children of the Gods on SciFi as two episodes a week apart. But those recordings are old and a bit fuzzy. This time I watched the remastered Final Cut version on commercial DVD.

I remember five scenes that are not in this version but were in the original: Sam telling Jack to call her by her rank rather than her salutation, Teal'c dragging Sargent Carol Weterings out of Aphophis' harem, a Goa'uld diving into Kawalsky, Teal'c giving his staff to Sam after they return to Earth, and the last scene, Kawalsky's eyes glowing.

I don't know why these scenes were cut, Kawalsky being a Goa'uld seems like an important detail, especially since it is part of the next episode.

In the beginning of the show, Apophis reopens the gate and goes back through. Since there isn't a dialing pedestal (or DHD as it will be called later), how did he open the gate? If he used the dialing computer, or ordered someone to dial, there would be a record of where he went, and therefore, no reason to go to Abydos.

Reviewed by Romana Drew July 7, 2020




















The Enemy Within


Season 1, Episode 3

Directed by Dennis Berry. Written by Brad Wright

Originally aired August 1, 1997

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Gary Jones, and Don S. Davis.

With Jay Acovone as Major Charles Kawalsky, Kevin McNulty as Dr. Warner, Alan Rachins as Colonel Kennedy, Warren Takeuchi as Young Doctor.

The dialing computer is now programmed with many gate addresses. SG1, headed up by Jack O'Neill, and SG2, headed up by Charles Kawalsky, are ready to do reconnaissance on two new planets. But Kawalsky has a headache.

It turns out that Kawalsky has an immature Goa'ul wrapped around his spine, attempting to take over.

Against Jack's wishes, Teal'c is questioned by Colonel Kennedy, who intends to take him away for study.

This is an exciting episode. It moves along without a hitch. Although Sam and Daniel don't have significant roles, it develops Jack's character and establishes Teal'c as a trustworthy ally. It also explains how the Goa'uld came to exploit the galaxy and why all the worlds are populated with humans from different time zones.

Now, the series is ready to head off to new adventures on different worlds.

Reviewed by Romana Drew July 9, 2020.




















Emancipation




Season 1 Episode 4

Directed by Jeff Woolnough. Written by Katharyn Powers.

Originally aired August 8, 1997

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Gary Jones, and Don S. Davis.

With Cary-Hiroyuki Tagawa as Turghan, Jorge Vargas as Abu, Soon-Tek Oh as Moughal, and Yan-Kay Crystal Lowe as Nya

SG1 steps through the Stargate into a beautiful meadow surrounded by forests with no evidence of humans. Attacking dogs chase a young man into the meadow. The team chases off the dogs. He is grateful until he sees Sam. Then members of his tribe ride into the scene and attempt to kill Sam.

When the father learns that the strangers saved his son's life, he welcomes SG1 to his village - as long as Sam agrees to dress the part, cover her face, and so forth. That night, she is kidnapped and sold to a rival clan.

During this part of the episode, Sam wears an elaborate sky blue dress. Although the costume is stunning, it is highly unlikely that the society portrayed, Mongolian nomads, would have access to such fine materials or such vibrant blue dyes.

Emancipation explores the exploitation and subjugation of women. Samantha Carter, soldier and scientist, isn't about to be subjugated or exploited.

The episode has some great lines and scenes. The conclusion is both action-packed and ever so satisfying. However, the episode drives home some points a bit too hard, making it tedious and predictable in a few places.

This is also the episode that sets the standard for languages. Everyone, whatever their history, speaks English. Of course, that doesn't make sense, but having a language issue in every episode slows things down and gets rather annoying.

Reviewed by Romana Drew July 13, 2020













The Broca Divide




Season 1, Episode 5

Directed by William Gereghty. Written by Jonathan Glassner

Originally aired August 15, 1997

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Gary Jones, and Don S. Davis.

With Teryl Rothery as Dr. Janet Fraiser, Steve Makaj as Colonel Makepeace, Nicole Oliver as Leedora, Gerard Plunkett as High Councilor Tuplo, Danny Wattley as Lieutenant Johnson, Roxana Phillip as Melosha,

The Broca Divide introduces Teryl Rothery as Dr. Janet Fraiser. She, along with Gary Jones, as Sgt. Walter Harriman, are credited as guest stars, but they are in almost every episode.

SG1 gates to P3X-797. They enter a dark world full of trees and are immediately attacked by a tribe of primitive humanoids. SG3 steps through the gate and chases the attackers away, assisted by a group of white-robed people who throw rocks at the primitives.

SG's 1 and 3 follow the white-robed people to their settlement, which looks much like a Minoan village.

The primitives living on the dark side of the planet are 'the touched,' normal humans who have reverted to an animalistic state. Since the Goa'uld have not visited this world for several generations, and there is nothing of technological value, Jack insists everyone return home.

All seems well until those who visited P3X-797 change and become violent.

The Broca Divide investigates another world where the Goa'uld placed humans from the past. Although this episode has some technical issues, it has plenty of action and suspense. Richard Dean Anderson does a great job fighting against the disease that has stripped him of rational thought. And Michael Shanks is wonderfully comedic as a creature defending his mate.

If one side of the planet is in perpetual darkness and the other in perpetual light, the vegetation on the two sides would be vastly different, but it isn't. The primitive humanoids don't seem to have the intelligence to make fire, and yet they are always sitting around a fire. A better question is, why do they stay in the dark? And, why is the stargate on the dark side?

The use of Chlorpheniramine Maleate to defeat the disease isn't too hard to accept, but using it as an anesthetic just doesn't ring true. It does make you sleepy, but getting hit by a dart full of it won't knock someone instantly unconscious.

There are anesthetics that render people unconscious in moments when injected into a vein, but when injected into muscle tissue, they take several minutes.

And, about those darts. It looks like they hold at least five milliters, a teaspoon. The syringe Sam wants to use on Daniel looks like a half full 10 ml syringe. That is way too much to inject intramuscularly.

Still, if not taken seriously, this is a fun episode.

Reviewed by Romana Drew July 16, 2020















Sam and Hanson

Daniel and the cave dwellers

The First Commandment




Season 1 Episode 6

Directed by Dennis Berry. Written by Robert C. Cooper.

Originally aired August 22, 1997

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Gary Jones, Teryl Rothery, and Don S. Davis.

With William Russ as Captain Jonas Hanson, Roger Cross as Lieutenant Connor, Zahf Paroo as Jamala, Adrian G. Griffiths as Lieutenant Baker, D. Neil Mark as Frakes, Darcy Laurie as Cave-Dweller.

SG9 is MIA, so SG1 goes to Avnil to retrieve them. They meet Lieutenant Connor, who tells them that SG9's leader, Captain Jonas Hanson, has gone native, posing as God and enslaving the people of this world. From there, things head south.

Sam gets captured. Hansen is her ex-fiance. And Connor is tied to a post and left to die.

This episode almost works. Most of it is fine, but there is just too much Hanson. Megalomaniacs with delusions of godhood are a common theme in stories about dystopian societies. They're often the cause of the dystopia.

In this case, Hanson's motives are not all that bad. The UV radiation on Avnil is deadly. The locals live in caves and only come out at night. Hanson wants to give the cave dwellers a chance to live in the open and improve their lives. So, he forces them to work in the sun until they die.

Although Hanson creates the problems that must be solved, his character is rather boring. Or rather, there is too much of him.

Sometimes, it's the actor who can't quite make the character interesting. But more often, as here, the actor is fine. The point is made in the first moment or two, but the scene goes on and on. It is like a song that finishes long before it ends, repeating verses and choruses more times than anyone wants to hear.

This isn't a really bad episode, just a bit repetitive and slow. You might want to fast forward through some of Hanson's self-aggrandizing speeches.

Reviewed by Romana Drew July 20, 2020















Jack and the Crystal

Jack and Charlie

Cold Lazarus




Season 1 Episode 7

Directed by Kenneth J. Girotti. Written by Jeff F. King.

Originally aired August 29, 1997

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Gary Jones, Teryl Rothery ,and Don S. Davis.

With Harley Jane Kozak as Sara O'Neill, Wally Dalton as Sara's Father, and Kyle Graham as Charlie O'Neill.

SG1 gates to a desert planet with patches of blue crystals. Jack touches a crystal and is knocked flat. His doppelganger then returns to Earth with the team. Even though the doppelganger acts a bit strange, no one notices until Jack wakes up and gates home, wondering why everyone left him.

Cold Lazarus fleshes out Jacks relationship with his ex-wife and his feelings about his son's death. It deals with powerful and difficult emotions in a sensitive and realistic way. This is the most adult and mature episode so far, a refreshing change from primitive people and megalomaniacs.

Kyle Graham was perfect as Charlie.

There are a few things that are not well explained. How do the crystals duplicate humans? How did the duplicate Jack turn into Charlie? Why did he spew out radiation for a while and then stop? Why did the Goa'uld consider the crystals so much of a threat that they blasted them to pieces?

Perhaps it's best not to ask those questions and just go with the story.

Reviewed by Romana Drew July 25, 2020















Anteaus and Nafrayu

Apophis

The Nox




Season 1 Episode 8

Directed by Charles Correll. Written by Hart Hanson

Originally aired September 12, 1997

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Gary Jones, Teryl Rothery ,and Don S. Davis.

With Armin Shimerman as Anteaus, Peter Williams as Apophis, Ray Xifo as Ohper, Frida Betrani as Lya, Terry David Mulligan as Secretary of Defense David Swift, and Addison Ridge as Nafrayu.

The secretary of defense complains that the Stargate program has not been successful at finding advanced tech. Teal'c suggests they visit a planet with a creature that can make itself invisible. Off they go.

They fail to capture the creature. Instead, they go after Apophis, who just happens to be wandering around with a couple of guards. It's a dumb idea. They should all know better. And they all get killed.

Not to worry, this is the home of the Nox.

Finding themselves alive in what appears to be a primitive society, SG1 sets out to protect these cute, little, unassuming beings from the evil Goa'uld.

This is a lesson in how appearances can be deceiving and why it is not wise to make assumptions before gathering sufficient data.

The Nox is an interesting episode, with several clever plot twists. It also introduces a race of beings with superior technology and no fear of the Goa'uld. The Nox will show up again in future episodes.

It is also nice to see Armin Shimerman (Quark) playing a different role.

Reviewed by Romana Drew July 29, 2020.















Jack and Kynthia

Kynthia doing the marriage dance

Brief Candle


Season 1 Episode 9

Directed by Mario Azzopardi. Story by Steven Barnes. Teleplay by Katharyn Powers.

Originally aired September 19, 1997

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Gary Jones, Teryl Rothery, and Don S. Davis.

With Bobbie Phillips as Kynthia, Harrison Coe as Alekos, Gabrielle Miller as Thetys.

SG1 gates to utopia, where all the people are young, healthy, and happy. They dance and sing all day.

Kynthia feeds Jack a special cake, just for him, and he ends up in her bed. The moment the sun goes down, everyone falls asleep, where ever they are, what ever they're doing, including Jack.

Infected by alien nanobots, the people of this world grow to adulthood in a few days and only live for one hundred days. Jack is infected even though he has already lived for thousands of days.

The search is on for a cure.

Although it has no battles or evil villians, Brief Candle is a nice episode, well worth watching. It gives Richard Dean Anderson an opportunity to stretch his acting skills a bit. But don't look too close at the logistics of this world.

The inhabitants dance, sing, and enjoy life, but never to do any work. So, where does the food come from? They fall asleep where ever they are the moment the sun goes down and wake the next day in the same clothes. Apparently, the nights don't get cold, and it never rains.

If the anyone goes far enough away from the village, they are no longer under the influence of the computer controlling the nanobots. It is hard to believe that no one has ever done this and returned to lead the villagers to freedom.

The inhabitants don't seem to grow old, so how do they die? Perhaps they just don't wake up one morning. Having a character die, and seeing how the village deals with it, would have been interesting.

Reviewed by Romana Drew August 1, 2020















Teal'c and Thor's Hammer

Daniel, Kendra, and Sam

Thor's Hammer




Season 1 Episode 10

Directed by Brad Turner. Written by Katharyn Powers.

Originally aired September 26, 1997

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Gary Jones, Teryl Rothery, and Don S. Davis.

With: Galyn Gorg as Kendra, Vincent Hammond as Unas, Tamsin Kelsey as Gairwyn, James Earl Jones as the voice of Unas, and Mark Gibbon as Thor.

Teal'c says that all Gou'ald are forbidden to visit Cimmeria, the home of Thor's hammer, so SG1 goes there.

As soon as they step through the gate, the locals laugh at them. A blue beam shines down from the top of an obelisk, scaning everyone. It concentrates on Teal'c. Jack tries to push Teal'c out of the beam, and they both disappear.

Jack and Teal'c end up in a maze of caves with Unas, an un-killable monster. Sam and Daniel ask the locals for help.

This episode just moves along at a great pace with never a dull moment. We learn that there is hope for those taken by the Goa'uld, along with a little history of the Goa'uld. We also meet Thor, or his avatar, and learn that other powerful races can protect planets from the Goa'uld.

That makes two races who don't fear the Goa'uld, the Nox, and Thor's race, which will be revealed in a future episode.

The people on Cimmeria are Vikings, which means they have been here for over a thousand years. Why haven't they developed any new technology? This can't be blamed on Goa'uld suppression. Goa'uld are dispatched as soon as they come through the gate.

Still, it is a good episode.

Reviewed by Romana Drew August 4, 2020
















Ernest Littlefield naked and wondering if SG1 is real

Ernest and Catherine

The Torment of Tantalus




Season 1 Episode 11

Directed by Jonathan Glassner. Written by Robert C. Cooper.

Originally aired October 3, 1997

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Gary Jones, Teryl Rothery, and Don S. Davis.

With Elizabeth Hoffman as Catherine Langford, Keene Curtis as Ernest Littlefield, Duncan Fraser as Professor Langford, Nancy Hillis as Young Catherine Langford, and Paul McGillion as Young Ernest Littlefield.

While reviewing footage of the 1945 gate experiments, Daniel discovers that the researchers succeeded in opening the gate and sending someone through. That person never returned. And, the gate research was abandoned.

Daniel shows the footage to Catherine Langford. She says the fellow who went through the gate was Ernest Littlefield, her fiance. She was told that he had died in an explosion. Although it has been fifty years, Ernest may still be alive.

So, off they go on a rescue mission, including Catherine. Of course, the DHD is broken, and the building about to fall into the sea.

This episode doesn't focus on the difficult and risky climb to the top of the building in a raging storm. That has been done many times. Instead it focuses on the people inside the building: Daniel's willingness to die in his search for knowledge, Jacks determination to get everyone home, and Catherine and Ernest coming to terms with the events that separated them.

The Torment of Tantalus is one of the great episodes. Keene Curtis' performance as Ernest Littlefield confronting real people after fifty years of living alone is sensitive and humorous. The team finds evidence of four advanced races and a world of information about those races, probably the gate builders. But, once again, that information is lost before it can be retrieved.

Reviewed by Romana Drew August 7, 2020















Drey'auc

Master Bra'tac

Bloodlines




Season 1 Episode 12

Directed by Mario Azzopardi. Written by Mark Saraceni. Teleplay by Jeff F. King

Originally aired October 10, 1997

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Gary Jones, Teryl Rothery, and Don S. Davis.

With Tony Amendola as Master as Bra'tac, Salli Richardson as Drey'auc, and Neil Denis as Rya'c.

Teal'c is determined to return to Chulak to stop his son from being implanted with a larval Goa'uld, or prim'ta. At first, General Hammond forbids Teal'c to leave, then the entire SG1 team goes with him.

Teal'c's house is in ruins, and his wife and son are missing. Teal'c's manages to stop the implantation but Rya'c is dying of scarlet fever.

Bloodlines explores life on Chulak. We meet Teal'c wife, Drey'aic, son, Ray'c, and his teacher, Master Bra'tac.

There are a couple of things that don't make sense. The larval Goa'uld are kept in a tank out in the open, unguarded. Sam and Daniel just walk up and steal one. If it is that easy to steal one, why did Drey'auc have to beg for one? And if all you have to do is stick one inside the pouch, why does it require a special tent and a priest?

This episode is well worth watching, but gets a bit slow and obvious in a couple of places.

It is nice to see Salli Richardson, Allison Blake from Eureka, in a very different role as Drey'auc.

Reviewed by Romana Drew August 10, 2020















Daniel and Nem

Hammond and Jack at Daniels wake.

Fire and Water




Season 1 Episode 13

Directed by Allan Eastman. Written by Brad Wright and Katharyn Powers. Teleplay by Katharyn Powers.

Originally aired October 14, 1997

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Gary Jones, Teryl Rothery, and Don S. Davis.

With Gerard Plunkett as Nem.

Sam, Jack, and Teal'c return from Oannes unexpectedly and sopping wet. They saw Daniel get killed in a fire spout, except they know he is alive. Daniel is kidnapped and held in an underwater lair by a Nem, an Ohnes, a sea-dwelling alien.

This episode explores how the team copes with the loss of a member. All the ceremonies seem hollow and unsettling. Sam, Jack, and Teal'c have recurring visions of Daniel's death, but they all feel he is still alive. While under the sea of Oannes, Nem demands Daniel tell him what happened to his mate four thousand years ago.

Nem's costume and makeup are great. What he eats, and why he lives underwater is not explained, but the lair is interesting.

At one point, Nem rushes out, leaving the "door" open. A force field holds back a wall of water. I liked the way Daniel first touched the wall then swam away.

The scenes in the SGC are interwoven with scenes in Nem's lair. The difference between the two worlds makes the switching a bit jarring but also adds interest to the episode.

A couple of questions. Daniel reads cuneiform writing that contains the name of Nem's mate. How did he learn to pronounce Cuneiform? That form of writing was used by several different cultures, with different languages, none of which are spoken today. Even if they were, the pronunciation would have changed.

How did Nem know Daniel had a memory of his mate? If he could 'see' the memory, why did he have to use a painful machine to retrieve it?

During the funeral, they hand a wreath on the event horizon of the gate, then it gets sucked into the wormhole. I wonder where it went? Imagine the people on the other end. The gate activates, and a ring of flowers lands on the ground. The gate closes.

Reviewed by Romana Drew August 14, 2020















Hathor and Jack

Hathor, babies, and daddy Daniel

Hathor




Season 1 Episode 14

Directed by Brad Turner. Written by David Bennett Carren and J. Larry Carroll. Teleplay by Jonathan Glassner

Originally aired October 24, 1997

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Gary Jones, Teryl Rothery, and Don S. Davis.

With Suanne Braun as Hathor.

A group of archeologists discover a Goa'uld sarcophagus. They twist the red button and out hops Hathor, goddess of fertility, inebriation, and music. Unfortunatly for the archeologists, Hathor isn't in a good mood, and they don't stay long alive.

Sensing the Stargate, Hathor infiltrates the SGC, where she entices all the men into her service. Daniel makes his unique contribution to Hathor's plans. Never fear, the women, and Teal'c, come to the rescue.

This is an entirely enjoyable episode. Suanne Braun is perfect as Hathor, the queen Goa'uld protecting all her little offspring.

I especially liked the way she got out of the tank and was perfectly dry. Of course, it was the film run backward, but it worked wonderfully well.

Now, we know where all those baby Goa'uld come from. And she escapes, so we can meet her again in a future episode.

Reviewed by Romana Drew, August 17, 2020.















Sam, Cassandra, and Daniel

Cassandra and her dog.

Singularity




Season 1 Episode 15

Directed by Mario Azzopardi. Written by Robert C. Cooper.

Originally aired October 31, 1997

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Gary Jones, Teryl Rothery, and Don S. Davis.

With Katie Stuart as Cassandra.

SG1 gates to Hanka to join SG7 and watch a black hole eclipse the sun. But everyone is dead, scientists and locals alike. Only one little girl is still alive. They take her back to Stargate Command.

Dr. Fraiser discovers naquadah in her blood. Soon a bomb grows inside her. If she goes through the gate, the bomb will explode, destroying the gate. If she doesn't go through the gate, the bomb will still explode with enough energy to pulverize Cheyanne Mountain and surrounding area.

This episode introduces Cassandra and naquadah, the material the Stargate is made of. Naquadah is quite versatile and will be a McGuffin and several future stories. We also learn of another Goa'uld named Nirrti.

Cassandra bonds with Sam and looks to her for help, which shows a motherly side of Sam. Daniel also shows his gentle, caring side as he supports both Sam and Cassandra.

Singularity is a bit like a ticking timebomb story with a twist at the end.

Reviewed by Romana Drew August 19, 2020.















Preparing Teal'c for His Execution

Hanno

Cor-Ai




Season 1 Episode 16

Directed by Mario Azzopardi. Written by Tom J. Astle.

Originally aired January 23, 1998

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Gary Jones, Teryl Rothery, and Don S. Davis.

With David McNally as Hanno, Peter Williams as Apophis, and Christina Jastrzembska as Female Elder.

SG1 gates to a planet Teal'c recognizes as Cartago. For once, there is a settlement surrounding the Staregate, more about that later. It looks as if everyone scattered as soon as the gate opened. Food is on the fire, but no one is around.

Slowly the villagers return. Hanno recognizes Teal'c as the Jaffa who killed his father. The villagers imprison Teal'c and prepare for Cor-Ai, or trial. Teal'c admits he killed Hanno's father and is sentenced to death. It makes no difference to Hanno that Apophis ordered Teal'c to kill his father.

Cor-Ai explores different concepts of justice. Here Teal'c is guilty unless he can prove his innocence. And his accuser, Hanno, is the only one who can determine his punishment.

Although the episode moves along at a good pace, it is a bit unsatisfying and predictable.

Apophis visits this world regularly to harvest people for implantation. When the lights on the gate activate, the villagers run and hide in nearby caves. Apophis only catches the slowest.

Why do the villagers continue to live around the gate? Why not move to a remote location where Apophis can't find them. Or, at least, make him travel some distance to catch them.

Also, Teal'c is a little out of character, giving up like that. Yes, he did terrible things as First Prime, but he wants to defeat the Goa'uld and free the Jaffa. He can't do that if he's dead. Staying alive to fight again should be pretty firmly ingrained in his personality.

Reviewed by Romana Drew August 26, 2020















Omoc and Narim

Lya

Enigma




Season 1 Episode 17

Directed by William Gereghty. Written by Katharyn Powers.

Originally aired January 30, 1998

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Gary Jones, Teryl Rothery, and Don S. Davis.

With Tobin Bell as Omoc, Garwin Sanford as Narim, Tom McBeath as Colonel Harry Maybourne, and Frida Betrani as Lya.

SG1 gates to a world in volcanic upheaval. They are about to go home when they discover several dying people covered with volcanic ash. They bring the survivors back to Stargate Command.

The Tollans are not pleased to have been rescued. They are human, but technology far advanced from Earth. Having seen a primitive race misuse their technology, they want nothing to do with Earth and are not shy about saying so.

In steps Colonel Harold Maybourne from NID (The National Intelligence Department, AKA National Institute of Defense.) He intends to take possession of the Tollans and transfer them to his jurisdiction: Hamond, SG1, and the Tollans object.

Colonel Maybourne is a complex and thoroughly obnoxious character who plays a role in many future episodes.

This is an interesting episode featuring another race with superior technology. They may be self-centered and standoffish, but at least they are peaceful. Omoc says that the Tollans know about the Goa'uld but do not interact with them even though their world has a gate.

If the Tollans are human, they must have originally come from Earth. Daniel suggests that we would be more advanced had it not been for the dark ages. The Goa'uld lost track of Earth when the gate was buried. The Tollan gate is still active. How come they were able to develop without Goa'uld interference?

Reviewed by Romana Drew August 22, 2020.















Sam and Jack

Hammond at the New Stargate

Solitudes




Season 1 Episode 18

Directed by Martin Wood. Written by Brad Wright.

Originally aired February 6, 1998

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Gary Jones, Teryl Rothery, and Don S. Davis.

Under an automated attack, SG1 leaps through the gate home as fast as they can. Daniel and Teal'c roll down the ramp at Stargate command. Sparks fly and the gate controllers burst off their mounts.

Jack and Sam wake to find themselves inside a glacier. Jack is injured. The gate is there, but the DHD has to be dug from its ice tomb. While Sam keeps Jack alive and fixes the DHD, Daniel, Teal'c, and General Hammond try to figure out where Jack and Sam are.

The first time I watched this, I assumed that Sam would fix the DHD, and she and Jack would gate home. Maybe there would be some complications, but ultimately that would be the conclusion. Instead, Daniel saves the day.

This is a good episode, showing how the team members are commitment to saving each other. It does get a little slow in the middle with Sam worrying over Jack. But the rest is excellent. The ending is great.

If Sam had tried to gate to a different world, they would never have found the second gate.

Reviewed by Romana Drew August 29, 2020.















Harlan "Comtrya"

Robot Jack

Tin Man




Season 1 Episode 19

Directed by Jimmy Kaufman. Written by Jeff F. King

Originally aired February 13, 1998

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Gary Jones, Teryl Rothery, and Don S. Davis.

With: Jay Brazeau as Harlan.

SG1 gates to P3X-989, Altair. They meet Harlan, the caretaker of a massive underground complex of machines. They get zapped by beams of light and wake up in different clothes. Jack's pissed and sends everyone back to Earth, where they discover that they are now androids.

The basic plot is quite simple. SG1 needs to get back into their human bodies so they can go on about their lives. However, a couple of philosophical questions are explored.

Can robots be human? All the members of the team feel human. They have the same desires, except being hungry or thirsty. So are they alive, or are they just machines?

What rights do sentient machines have? On Earth, they are imprisoned and then sent back to Altair. The humans return to Earth, leaving their mechanical counterparts to live with Harlan forever, a fate none of the humans would ever accept.

The ending is a bit unsatisfying. The robots have the same minds as the humans. It is unrealistic to expect them to stay put and fix the machine forever. Never fear, we will see them in later episodes.

Reviewed by Romana Drew September 1, 2020.















Daniel and the Mirror

General Jack O'Neill and Teal'c

There But for the Grace of God




Season 1 Episode 20

Directed by David Warry-Smith. Written by David Kemper. Teleplay by Robert C. Cooper.

Originally aired February 20, 1998

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Gary Jones, Teryl Rothery, and Don S. Davis.

With Elizabeth Hoffman as Dr. Catherine Langford.

On P3R-233, Daniel discovers a collection of objects from other worlds. Teal'c finds a Goa'uld warning to stay away, so Jack orders everyone home. Before he leaves, Daniel touches a mirror and gets a mild shock. When he goes to the gate, everyone is gone, so he gates home to a very different Earth.

Catherine Langford is in charge of the Stargate program, Jack is in charge of the military. The Goa'uld are destroying Earth, and nobody knows Daniel.

This episode introduces the concept of alternate universes, something that will be used in future episodes. It is also the first of four episodes. The next two episodes close out season 1 with a cliffhanger. The fourth is the first episode of season 2.

The mirror Daniel touched is straight out of Star Trek. It looks a lot like the time portal on Golana, that Molly O'Brian fell through. And it's not too far off from the one in the TOS episode, The City of the Edge of Forever.

This is a fast-paced and exciting episode. It lets us see the main characters in somewhat different roles.

Reviewed by Romana Drew September 3, 2020.



















Kensey and Samuels
The dynamic duo.

General Hammond

Politics




Season 1 Episode 21

Directed by Martin Wood. Teleplay by Brad Wright. Exercepts by Jonathan Glassner, Brad Wright, Hart Hanson, Jeff F. King, Robert C. Cooper, Steven Barnes, and Katharyn Powers.

Originally aired February 27, 1998

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Gary Jones, Teryl Rothery, and Don S. Davis.

With Ronny Cox Senator as Robert Kinsey and Robert Wisden as Lt. Colonel Bert Samuels,

Daniel returns from his trip to the alternate reality with an injured shoulder and a wild tale to tell.

Senator Robert Kinsey, chair of the Senate Appropriations Committee decides it is time to shut down the Stargate program because it is a waste of money and hasn't produced any significant technological breakthroughs. He dismisses the Goa'uld threat.

Most of this episode is either talking heads or flashbacks. It is the second of four connected episodes that close out season 1 and introduce season 2. Shutting down Stargate Command is its only contribution to the story arc.

It's a nice review of season 1, but it can be skipped with only a slight blip in continuity.

Reviewed by Romana Drew September 4, 2020















Jack and Klorel.

Daddy Apophis talking to his son, Klorel

Within the Serpent's Grasp




Season Episode 22

Directed by David Warry-Smith. Story by James Crocker. Teleplay by Jonathan Glassner.

Originally aired March 6, 1998

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Gary Jones, Teryl Rothery, and Don S. Davis.

With Peter Williams as Apophis and Alexis Cruz as Skaara / Klorel.

Stargate Command is shut down, and the gate is scheduled to be buried. Daniel persuades SG1 to defy orders and go through the Stargate to the address he found on the alternate world, believing it to be the Goa'uld homeworld. But it isn't a planet, it's a Goa'uld attack vessel orbiting a planet.

As soon as the ship goes into hyperdrive, the Stargate is useless, trapping SG1 on the very ship destined to destroy Earth. Although that is just where they need to be if they want to sabotage the attack, it's also smack dab in the middle of hundreds of jaffa with no place to hide.

This is an exciting episode. It builds from frustration with the obvious stupidity of the politicians to a daring escape to save Earth. In the end, SG1 is captured, and Earth is about to die.

The ship is great, lots of gold panels with raised hieroglyphics, very showy. It's also quite convenient that every corridor is lined wide pillars just perfect for hiding behind.

Originally viewers had to wait nearly three months to watch the conclusion - the first episode of the next season. I am reviewing them separately because that suits my website organization better. However, I watched them one after the other. I highly recommend doing so.

Reviewed by Romana Drew September 5, 2020












The Tok'ra
Season 2






Apophis and Klorel.

Daniels Last Stand

The Serpent's Lair




Season 2 Episode 1

Directed by Jonathan Glassner. Written by Brad Wright.

Originally aired:
Sky One - June 26, 1998
Showtime June 26, 1998

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Gary Jones, Teryl Rothery, and Don S. Davis.

With Tony Amendola as Master Bra'tac, Robert Wisden as Lt. Colonel Bert Samuels, Peter Williams as Apophis, and Alexis Cruz as Skaara/Klorel.

Trapped on one of two Goa'uld Ha'tak attack ships, SG1 struggles to stay alive long enough to blow up the ships and prevent Earth's destruction. While down below, Colonel Samuels assures everyone that the military has the situation under control, while sending groups of people through the gate to the Alpha Site, just in case the Goa'uld succeed.

When all is lost, Master Bra'tac shows up to save the day, sort of. And Daniel dies for the second time.

The Serpent's Lair is the first episode of the second season and the exciting conclusion to Within the Serpent's Grasp, the final episode of the first season. These two episodes are best watched one right after the other. I am somewhat surprised that someone hasn't released them as a movie.

There are some great scenes with Hammond and Samuels, and equally great scenes with Jack and Bra'tac. Samuel's mindset is not that far off from Apophis'. When failure seems imminent, run away, to hell with everyone else.

There are a few technical goofs: The sarcophagus apparently repaired Daniel's clothing as well as his wounds - same for Kloral. Samuels assurances that the missiles were invisible to radar is silly. They were visible to the naked eye.

All that aside, this is a superb episode.

Reviewed by Roman Drew September 6, 2020















Sam/Jolinar

Dr. Jacobs/Ashrak & Daniel
just before Teal'c zats them both

In the Line of Duty




Season 2 Episode 2

Directed by Martin Wood. Written by Robert C. Cooper.

Originally aired:
Sky One July 3, 1998
Showtime July 3, 1998

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Gary Jones, Teryl Rothery, and Don S. Davis.

Peter Lacroix as Ashrak/Dr. Jacobs and Katie Stuart as Cassandra.

On Nasya, SG1 and the Nasyan village is attacked by Goa'uld death gliders. They run for the gate, taking as many Nasyans as they can save.

While Sam is giving mouth to mouth to a dying Nasyan, a Goa'uld symbiote jumps into her mouth. Back at Stargate command, Sam looks the same, but her behavior is a bit off. Her symbiote pulls off the disguise until she is outed by Cassandra, who can sense Goa'uld.

Imprisoned in Stargate Command, the Goa'uld insists she is Jolinar of Malkshur, a Tok'ra, and an enemy of the Goa'uld.

Meanwhile, back at the hospital, Dr. Jacobs is infected with an Ashrak, a Goa'uld super-assassin bent on killing Jolinar/Sam.

In the Line of Duty introduces the Tok'ra, another race that will play important roles during this season.

I understand why the writers wanted the viewer to think that Sam was infected with an evil Goa'uld in the early part of the episode. But in retrospect, Jolinar's behavior is too harsh at first. Also, letting Sam talk a bit more would have helped Jolinar convince the others that she wasn't evil, although that might have messed up the story line.

These are small complaints. The episode is a good one.

Reviewed by Romana Drew September 8, 2020.















Hadante

Releasing the Destroyer of Worlds

Prisoners




Season 2 Episode 3

Directed by David Warry-Smith. Written by Terry Curtis Fox.

Originally aired:
Sky One July 10, 1998
Showtime July 10, 1998

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Gary Jones, Teryl Rothery, and Don S. Davis.

With Bonnie Bartlett as Linea, Mark Acheson as Vishnoor, David Bloom as Scavenger, and Kim Kondrashoff as Roshure.

While SG1 explores the rainforest on a new planet, a man in ragged clothing crawls up, begging for help. They're headed back for the gate anyway, and offer to help him. A light from above transports them to an empty room. Disembodied voices find them guilty of trespassing and helping a criminal, sentencing them all to life in prison.

They are sent through a Stargate to Hadante, an underground prison. The only escape is throught the Stargate. Without a DHD, that is impossible.

Life is pretty rough in Hadante. An elderly woman, Linea, rules the roost.

Prisoners is well done and moves along without a problem. However, like all prison stories, it is a bit dark and depressing at times. Since the series continues for several more years, the crew obviously escapes. But it doesn't end there.

Unleashing the Destroyer of Worlds on an unsuspecting universe sounds ominous. But that storyline is dropped, which is a bit unsatisfying. It would have been nice to encounter Lenea again. However, the first time viewer doesn't know that, making the ending feel almost like a cliffhanger.

Reviewed by Romana Drew September 10, 2020.















Jack in the machine

The Keeper

Daniel is pissed

The Gamekeeper




Season 2 Episode 4

Directed by Martin Wood. Story by Jonathan Glassner & Brad Wright. Teleplay by Jonathan Glassner

Originally aired
Sky One July 17, 1998
Showtime July 17, 1998

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Gary Jones, Teryl Rothery, and Don S. Davis.

With Dwight Schultz as the Keeper, Jay Acovone as Captain Charles Kawalsky, Michael J Rogers as Colonel John Michaels, Lisa Bunting as Claire Jackson, and Robert Duncan as Melburn Jackson.

SG1 gates into a well-tended garden on P7J-989, but nobody is around. There is, however, a dome with unconscious people hooked up to machines. Before long, the devices capture all the members of SG1.

The devices transport Jack and Teal'c back in time into the middle of a raid in Germany, where one of Jack's friends gets killed. As soon as that happens, the scene resets, and they must do it again.

Daniel and Sam get transported back to a museum where Daniel's parents are killed. As soon as they die, the scene resets, and it happens again.

The Gamekeeper is a variation on time loop stories where only one or two characters know that time is repeating. Those can be fun stories, but this one isn't. The two scenarios that loop are tragedies causing Daniel and Jack emotional distress, while the residents of the planet watch for pleasure. To make things worse, the Keeper can't understand why Jack and Daniel refuse to keep repeating these events.

The scene with Daniel's parents just doesn't work. No museum, or equipment operator, would let anyone stand under a large, heavy object as it is moved about. Nor would anyone with half a brain be where his parents were.

Dwight Shultz (Reginald Barclay on Star Trek and Amis in the Babylon 5 episode The Long Dark) plays the Keeper to perfection.

Teal'c and Sam don't have adventures of their own because the machines cannot extract their memories. Teal'c because he is Jaffa, and Sam because she was Jolinar's host, which suggests that Jolinar may have left Sam with more than just memories.

Reviewed by Romama Drew September 14, 2020



















Daniel and Jack

Shyla

Need




Season 2 Episode 5

Directed by David Warry-Smith. Story by Robert C. Cooper & Damian Kindler. Teleplay by Robert C. Cooper

Originally aired
Sky One July 24, 1998
Showtime July 24, 1998

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Gary Jones, Teryl Rothery, and Don S. Davis.

With Heather Hanson as Shyla and George Touliatos as Pyrus.

While SG1 secretly watch villagers place a container of naquadah through the Stargate, a young woman stands at the edge of a precipice. Daniel pulls her back, just as she starts to fall into the abyss.

Since no good deed goes unpunished, they are all captured and forced to work in the naquadah mine. An attempted escape leaves Daniel critically injured. Shyla, the woman he saved, places him in a sarcophagus to heal. She wants him for a husband,. The rest struggle to stay alive in the mine.

And Daniel dies (almost) again.

Need explores the addictive effects of the sarcophagus and how it changes the personalities of those who use it. It does explain in part why the Goa'uld believe themselves to be gods, and why the Tok'ra don't use the sarcophagus.

We also learn that Sam can tell if someone is Goa'uld by just being near them.

This episode starts to showcase Michael Shank's acting skill as Daniel's personality changes, and he goes through withdrawal.

It was too easy to persuade Shyla to destroy the sarcophagus. How did she know that shooting it with a staff weapon would deactivate but not blow up the entire building? Why do the pretend Jaffa guards sound like Goa'uld? And, why didn't SG1 go through to the address they sent the naquadah, or at least send a probe?

Reviewed by Romana Drew September 16, 2020.















Thor

Heru'ur

Thor's Chariot




Season 2 Episode 6

Directed by William Gereghty. Written by Katharyn Powers

Originally aired
Sky One July 31, 1998
Showtime July 31, 1998

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Gary Jones, Teryl Rothery, and Don S. Davis.

With Tamsin Kelsey as Gairwyn, Andrew Kavadas as Olaf, Douglas Arthurs as Heru'ur, and Mark Gibbon as Thor.

The Stargate activates. The iris closes. The gate deactivates, leaving a trace of Iridium. Sam thinks the Cimmerians sent the Sagan Institute Box through. So, they send a probe to Cimmeria.

The Goa'uld Heru'ur has devastated the village and built three landing platforms. Motherships are on the way. Out-numbered and out-gunned a thousand to one, SG1 searches for The Hall of Might, believing it to be a weapon to defeat the Goa'uld.

The Hall of Might is puzzle room full of impossible challenges. To the writer's credit, there are only two challenges. Both work well and move along just fine.

Instead of weapons, they discover Thor, the little gray guy, and our first view of the Asgard. We also meet Heru'ur, son of Ra and Hathor, and all-around bad guy.

This episode works quite well. It has excitement, intellectual challenges, and great views of the landing platforms.

Reviewed by Romana Drew September 21, 2020.















The Sphere

Jack and the glowing microorganisms

Message in a Bottle




Season 2 Episode 7

Directed by David Warry-Smith. Story by Michael Greenburg & Jarrad Paul. Teleplay by Brad Wright

Originally aired
Sky One August 7, 1998
Showtime August 7, 1998

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Gary Jones, Teryl Rothery, and Don S. Davis.

Tobias Mehler as Lieutenant Graham Simmons and Dan Shea Sargent Siler.

On a trip to P5C-353, an airless world, SG1 collects a sphere that emits low levels of power and was obviously made by an advanced race. Back at Stargate Command, Sam and Daniel attempt to decipher the device.

It comes to life, skewers Jack, sends out streams of glowing microorganisms, takes over the computers, and activates the self-destruct.

The episode moves along pretty well. The microorganism is apparently intelligent. It can manipulate computers and communicate through Jack.

If I suspend my disbelief and accept that these microorganisms can manipulate materials, understand alien (to them) electronics, and commandeer the mind of a human, I still can't figure out why they need writing.

The sphere is covered with tiny writing. Daniel sees the writing through the spacesuit helmet, so it must be thousands of times larger than the microorganisms. Do they eventually coalesce into larger organisms, or do they just spread all over everything like a fungus? If so, what do they think about, and how did they make the sphere? Does the sphere contain a master brain controlling all the little minions?

We'll never know.

Reviewed by Romana Drew September 22, 2020.















Jack in Disguise

Apophis and Rya'c

Family




Season 2 Episode 8

Directed by William Gereghty. Written by Katharyn Powers

Originally aired
Sky One August 14, 1998
Showtime August 14, 1998

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Gary Jones, Teryl Rothery, and Don S. Davis.

Peter Williams as Apophis, Tony Amendola as Master Bra'tac, Brook Susan Parker as Drey'auc, Peter Bryant as Fro'tak, and Neil Denis as Rya'c. as

Bra'tac gates to Earth with news - Apophis and Klorel are alive and harassing Chulak. And Apophis has kidnapped Rya'c. Hammond orders a rescue mission to bring both Rya'c and Drey'auc to Earth.

But Drey'auc is remarried, and Rya'c is brainwashed, believing Apophis a loving God.

Brook Susan Parker plays Drey'auc in this episode, Salli Richardson played Dreyauc in Bloodlines during the first season.

The first half of this episode runs along just fine, but it gets a little tedious once Rya'c is captured. I can't fault Neil Denis's acting. He does a fine job of being both cloyingly cooperative and out of control angry. But the script is rather predictable.

It is a little hard to believe that anyone could be brainwashed to the extent that Rya'c is; or recover without any memory of the experience. Also, Rya'c tries to bite down and break two teeth implanted by Apophis. Why couldn't he feel that the teeth were now missing?

I wonder just how happy Drey'auc and Rya'c will be in the Land of Light. They eventually return to the show in future episodes.

Reviewed by Romana Drew September 26, 2020.















Kasuf and Sha're

Jacob Carter

Secrets


Season 2 Episode 9

Directed by Duane Clark. Written by Terry Curtis Fox

Originally aired
Sky One August 21, 1998
Showtime August 21, 1998

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Gary Jones, Teryl Rothery, and Don S. Davis.

Vaitiare Hirshon as Sha're / Amaunet, Peter Williams as Apophis, Carmen Argenziano as General Jacob Carter, Douglas Arthurs as Heru'ur, and Erick Avari as Kasuf.

It has been one year since Daniel left Abydos and the gate was buried. It is onc again operational. He and Teal'c travel to Abydos to tell Kasuf, his daughter, Sha're, has been taken by a Goa'uld. At the same time, Jack and Sam travel to DC to receive an award from the president.

Sha're is on Abydos about to give birth to Apophis' child - his future host - which is a bit weird. While she is pregnant, Amaunet 'sleeps', letting Sha're do as she wishes. Once the baby is born, Amaunet takes over, Heru'ur and Apophis show up, and the excitement begins.

In Washington, Sam learns that her father is dying of cancer. Jack discovers a reporter who knows way too much about the Stargate program.

This is an important episode for two different story arcs. Both Jacob and Sha're's baby play significant roles in future stories.

Parts of this episode hark back to the original movie. Jack tells the reporter. "O'Neill', with two Ls. There's another Colonel O'Neil with only one L, and he has no sense of humor at all." Which sounds a lot like Kurt Russell's O'Neil.

Although Michael Shanks has added depth and complexity to Daniel Jackson, while on Abydos, he is back to copying James Spader.

Reviewed by Romana Drew September 27, 2020.















Teal'c and Bug

Ally

Bane




Season 2 Episode 10

Directed by David Warry-Smith. Written by Robert C. Cooper.

Originally aired
Sky One September 25, 1998
Showtime August 21, 1998

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Gary Jones, Teryl Rothery, and Don S. Davis.

With Tom McBeath as Colonel Harry Maybourne, Scott Hylands as Dr. Timothy Harlow, and Colleen Rennison as Ally.

SG1 gates to Svoriin, a technologically advanced planet with no people. It isn't long before a giant bug lands on Teal'c's back. Before Jack can shoot, it stings Teal'c, and a swarm swoops down out of the sky. They hightail it for the gate.

Teal'c's DNA changes. Even his symbiote can't stop it. Maybourne shackles Teal'c for a trip to the netherworld of NID. Teal'c breaks Maybourne's arm and escapes, leaving his larval Goa'uld to die. The chase is on.

The team must find Teal'c before he turns into a swarm of bugs, his primta dies, or Maybourne finds him.

The only thing wrong with this episode is that it comes between Secrets and Tok'ra: Part 1, interrupting that storyline.

Christopher Judge does a great job of being sick, and Colleen Rennison is wonderful as his savior. We even get to spend time with despicable Maybourne.

SG1 takes a video of bugs hatching from a dead person. That implies that they arrived on Svoriin just after the bugs killed everyone. It's a bit too coincidental, but the episode is fun to watch. Although, Bug Wars might have been a better title.

Reviewed by Romana Drew October 3, 2020.















Yosuuf/Garshaw of Belote, Cordesh and Martouf/Lantash

Martouf and Sam

The Tok'ra: Part 1




Season 2 Episode 11

Directed by Brad Turner. Written by Jonathan Glassner

Originally aired
Sky One October 2, 1998
Showtime October 2, 1998

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Gary Jones, Teryl Rothery, and Don S. Davis.

With Carmen Argenziano as General Jacob Carter, Sarah Douglas as Yosuuf / Garshaw of Belote, JR Bourne as Martouf / Lantash, Winston Rekert as Cordesh, Joy Coghill as Saroosh / Selmak, and Steve Makaj as Colonel Makepeace.

In a dream, Sam remembers Jolinar dialing a gate address as the Tok'ra fled an attack. Hammond orders a mission to that world. While SG1 is off-world, Sam's father is hospitalized in critical condition.

The Tok'ra are not impressed with the Tau'ri, especially since none will become a host to Selmak. His host, Saroosh, is dying of old age. When SG3 shows up to take Sam home, things go further south.

Part 1 ends with a cliff hanger, as expected. Even though I have seen these episodes before, I can't wait to view part 2.

Amanda Tapping does a sensitive job of portraying Jolinar's feelings and her attraction to Martouf.

Although the Tok'ra's crystal built tunnels are a clever idea, interesting sets, and good special effects, they're just a little hard to believe. An enormous amount of energy is required to convert tons of dirt into crystals and it would probably produce, or require, an equally enormous amount of heat.

The special effects of the rings on the sand were great. The sand bounced and really looked as if the rings popped up and down through it.

Reviewed by Romana Drew September 28, 2020.















Jack, Yosuuf/Garshaw of Belote, Daniel, and Jacob.

Saroosh/Selmak

The Tok'ra: Part 2




Season 2 Episode 12

Directed by Brad Turner. Written by Jonathan Glassner

Originally aired
Sky One October 9, 1998
Showtime October 9, 1998

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Gary Jones, Teryl Rothery, and Don S. Davis.

With Carmen Argenziano as General Jacob Carter/Selmak, Sarah Douglas as Yosuuf/Garshaw of Belote, JR Bourne as Martouf/Lantash, Winston Rekert as Cordesh, Joy Coghill as Saroosh/Selmak, and Steve Makaj as Colonel Makepeace.

The Tok'ra refuse to let SG's 1 and 3 return to Earth, and Sam's father is dying of cancer. Selmak's host Saroosh is also dying. Sam suggest her father as a possible host for Selmak. Sam and Jack return to Earth to visit Jacob Carter, and the Goa'uld attack the Tok'ra settlement.

This episode has plenty of action and excitement, as well as several absolutely charming scenes between Jacob Carter and Saroosh/Selmak. Carmen Argenziano does a sensitive portrayal of Jacob's doubts and eventual determination to become a host. But Joy Coghill steals the scenes. An amazing performance especially considering that all we can see is her head, and she lays still on a slab.

Although the Tok'ra claim not to be Goa'uld, they are just as arrogant.

I do have one question. Cordesh, the spy, says he isn't who they think he is just before the tunnel devours him. I took that to mean that he didn't have his usual symbiont but had been taken over by a Goa'uld. Later, a woman is found carrying the communications device and is found to be carrying a Goa'uld. Is it the same Goa'uld, or a different one? If it is the same one, how did it survive being entombed? If it transferred hosts before Cordesh died, why didn't he run from the tunnel? If it is a different one, the Tok'ra had two spies.

Reviewed by Romana Drew September 29, 2020.















Tonane

T'akaya and Xe'ls

Spirits




Season 2 Episode 13

Directed by Martin Wood. Written by Tor Alexander Valenza.

Originally aired
Sky One October 23, 1998
Showtime October 23, 1998

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Gary Jones, Teryl Rothery, and Don S. Davis.

With Rodney A. Grant as Tonane, Alex Zahara as Xe'ls, Christina Cox as T'akaya, Kevin McNulty as Dr. Warner.

PXY-887 is rich in Trinium, a useful mineral, so SG11 goes there to mine the stuff. Then they go missing. The gate opens with their code, but instead of SG11, an arrow flies through, winging Jack.

Sam leads Daniel and Teal'c to PXY-887 to find SG11 and make a deal for Trinium. They get captured by the locals, descendants of the Salish.

Tonane's tribe has access to technology that appears magical, far beyond their technological development. Why that is unfolds during the episode. The plot has lots of twists, turns, and misunderstandings, which keep it interesting and moving along at a good clip.

Rodney A. Grant's Tonane is loveable and unique. He takes everything in stride. He never makes demands, but also can't be swayed from his convictions. Unimpressed by all the modern technology, he only wants to go home.

Reviewed by Romana Drew October 7, 2020.















LaMoor with the Touchstone

Escaping Through the Second Gate

Touchstone




Season 2 Episode 14

Directed by Brad Turner. Written by Sam Egan.

Originally aired
Sky One October 30, 1998
Showtime October 30, 1998

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Gary Jones, Teryl Rothery, and Don S. Davis.

With Tom McBeath as Colonel Harry Maybourne, Matthew Walker as Roham, Jerry Wasserman as Whitlow, Tiffany Lyndall-Knight as La Moor.

SG1 gates to Madrona to study the Touchstone, a device that controls the planetary weather. A wild electrical storm is brewing, the Touchstone is missing, and the locals accuse SG1 of stealing the device.

Back on Earth, the weather is bonkers. They surmise that the second gate was used to steal the Touchstone. It is now on Earth, and someone is experimenting with it.

Maybourne and the NID are at it again, or are they? There is some question as to how much Maybourne actually knows. He doesn't seem to be the one pulling the strings.

Touchstone establishes adversarial forces at work within the US government. This opens up many opportunities for stories about those forces and about the second Stargate, which probably isn't as secure as it appears to be.

I wonder why Jack and Daniel returned to Madrona to tweak the gate so they could send a MALP to the second gate. Couldn't they have gone to any other planet, one without a blizzard? Of course, going to Madrona showed how critical it was to find and return the Touchstone.

I also wonder how something so small can alter weather on any level.

If memory serves, the show never returns to Madrona, and Earth never benefits from any form of weather control.

The picture of the gate on its side brings one more question to mind. What happens if you travel to a gate that is on its side? Do you pop through and then fall back onto the event horizon? Do you sit there waiting for the thing to shut off, or do you die? The gate is one way, so you can't end up where you started.

I think Teal'c does this in a future episode.

Reviewed by Romana Drew October 9, 2020















Watch Out Jack

The Asgard

The Fifth Race




Season 2 Episode 15

Directed by David Warry-Smith. Written by Robert C. Cooper.

Originally aired
Sky One December 16, 1998
Showtime January 22, 1999

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Gary Jones, Teryl Rothery, and Don S. Davis.

While exploring new gate addresses, the MALP sends back pictures of symbols, just like those found in the repository where Ernest Littlefield was trapped. The crew gates into an empty room with no visible means of escape. Jack steps into a circle, and a device pops out of the wall. It grabs Jack by the head, shines lights into his eyes, and then lets him go.

When he regains consciousness, back at the SGC, Jack reprograms the dialing computer, talks in a strange language, and builds weird devices.

This episode takes us to the Asgard homeworld in another galaxy. It also gives a little more information on the gate builders. They are called the Ancients, one of an alliance of four powerful races, including the Asgard, Nox, and the Furlings, who we never meet.

The Asgard tell Jack that humans may become the fifth race. They never they mention the Goa'uld.

Jack undergoes significant changes in The Fifth Race, but never seems disturbed by the changes. With Daniel advocating for him, saying he has the knowledge of the ancients in his mind, Jack is permitted to do the things he needs to get back to normal.

Also, this episode doesn't have any real guest stars. There are, of course, the Asgard, but they are either computer generated or animatronic, and therefore, never get credited.

Reviewed by Romana Drew October 12, 2020.















Cromwell on P3W-451

Jack on a Rope

A Matter of Time




Season 2 Episode 16

Directed by Martin Wood. Story by Misha Rashovich. Teleplay by Brad Wright.

Originally aired
Sky One December 9, 1998
Showtime January 29, 1999

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Gary Jones, Teryl Rothery, and Don S. Davis.

Dan Shea as Sgt. Siler, Marshall R. Teague as AF Colonel Frank Cromwell, Tobias Mehler as Lieutenant Graham Simmons.

SG10 attempts to gate home before a black hole engulfs them. They never make it through the Stargate, so a probe is sent to P3W-451. Time has slowed, and SG11 looks as if they are frozen mid-stride.

The black hole's gravitational pull slows time inside the SGC and stops the Stargate from shutting down. The longer the gate stays open, the greater the effects. Time slows, and gravity increases. If the Stargate isn't shut down, the entire planet may be pulled through the Stargate into the black hole!

This is one of those, you've got twenty minutes to save the world stories. If you lean back and watch without thinking too much, it's quite enjoyable, with lots of excitement, questions to answer, problems to solve, good characters. Great show.

However, there are a few things that don't make sense. How can the gate get power from a black hole? Lots of energy surrounds black holes, radiation from compressed matter, dust and rocks whirling around the gravity well and getting launched back into space. I have a hard time believing this unstable and unpredictable energy can power the Stargate.

The ropes that Jack and Frank Cromwell climb down have several problems. Siler stands at the edge of the observation room and feeds the ropes out horizontally. Why doesn't the gate exert the same gravitational force on him? Yes, the gravity gets stronger as objects approach the Stargate, but that should be gradual, not have a cut-off point. Especially since it is affecting time throughout the SGC. The people in the control room should be fighting against the pull from the gate and leaning away from it as the center of gravity is no longer the center of the Earth.

There are several other technical problems with that scene, but let's move on.

Why did two people have to follow the bomb to the gate? Couldn't they have triggered the bomb via a wire run back to the control room? Of course, that wouldn't be nearly as exciting.

A white dwarf star engulfs a larger star. When it reaches critical mass, a black hole forms. That should have caused a supernova, which may then form a black hole, but not before it obliterates all of nearby space in a matter of seconds or less.

I may be wrong. Stellar physics isn't my field of expertise.

Reviewed by Romana Drew October 15, 2020















Ma'chello

Ma'chello and Fred

Holiday.




Season 2 Episode 17

Directed by David Warry-Smith, Written by Tor Alexander Valenza.

Originally aired
Sky One January 13, 1999
Showtime February 5, 1999

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Gary Jones, Teryl Rothery, and Don S. Davis.

With Alvin Sanders as Fred, Melanie Skehar as Waitress, Darryl Scheelar as Cop, and Michael Shanks as Ma'chello.

SG1 finds an abandoned lab with odd equipment and notes in an unknown language. After a few minutes, an old man named Ma'chello appears. He asks Daniel to take hold of two handles while he grabs the other two. Ma'chello collapses and is brought back to Earth.

The old man wakes, claiming to be Daniel. Ma'chello, now in Daniel's body, wonders around the town, eating food and wondering how to find a wife. While Daniel, trapped inside Ma'chello's body, lies in sickbay near death.

In the meantime, Jack and Teal'c inadvertently switch bodies.

Holiday is an opportunity for Richard Dean Anderson and Christopher Judge to stretch their acting wings playing each other's characters. It also showcases Michael Shanks' versatility. He plays himself, Ma'cello as an old man, and Ma'chello in Daniel's body.

Except for a philosophical discussion between Daniel as Ma'chello and Daniel as a dying old man that goes on a bit too long, this is a fine episode. Sam saves the day by orchestrating a session of musical bodies.

Reviewed by Romana Drew October 20, 2020.















Elder

Plants and Teal'c

One False Step




Season 2 Episode 19

Directed by William Corcoran. Written by Michael Kaplan & John Sanborn.

Originally aired
Sky One February 19, 1999
Showtime February 19, 1999

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Gary Jones, Teryl Rothery, and Don S. Davis.

With David Cameron as Elder, Richard de Klerk as Joe, Shaun Phillips as Jim.

Sam sends a UAV to PJ2-445, where it crashes into a strange plant. SG1 follows to retrieve the UAV and to meet the hominoids who live there. One by one, the locals keel over unconscious. Sam and Teal'c return to Earth. Jack and Daniel develop headaches.

This is an interesting, although somewhat hard to believe society. There are huts to live in, but no evidence of tools, food, eating, or even places to sleep, except the ground. The locals are dependent upon noise produced by the plants. The damaged plant has contaminated the entire system.

Since the locals don't have any way to recover from the bad vibes, it suggests that no plant has ever been damaged before. That seems very unlikely.

This is a good, fun episode. The CGI'd plants are great as they rise up and sink back down, and finally flower.

David Cameron does a superb job as the alien who hangs around the humans. He has no lines but the most expressive face.

Reviewed by Romana Drew October 26, 2020.















Charlie

Mother

Show and Tell.




Season 2, Episode 20

Directed by Peter DeLuise. Written by Jonathan Glassner

Originally aired
Sky One February 26, 1999
Showtime February 26, 1999

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Gary Jones, Teryl Rothery, and Don S. Davis.

With Carmen Argenziano as Jacob Carter / Selmak, Jeff Gulka as Charlie, and Peter DeLuise as Machine Gun Guard.

The Stargate opens, and a young boy steps through. He says his mother made him to warn the humans of an attack by a rebel faction of the Reetu.

Apparently, the Goa'uld are at war with the Reetu. Some Reetu have decided to eliminate all possible Goa'uld hosts, Earth included. Just one problem - the Reetu are invisible. This would have been an impossible situation except for help from Jacob/Selmak and Tollan weapons.

Jeff Gulka does a spectacular job as Charlie. Although he looks about five or six, he was thirteen when he played Charlie. The strength of his performance carries this story.

Show and Tell also shows a softer side of Jack. He lets the boy use his son's name, both befriending and protecting Charlie.

We never get a good look at the Reetu, but they appear to be a cross between the Shadows from Babylon 5 and the Bugs from Starship Troopers. Although this episode would lead you to believe that the rogue Reetu will become a recurring threat, we never hear about them again - if memory serves.

This episode starts with a sensitive story about a seriously ill and possibly delusional little boy. Then it builds up to an exciting, action-packed conclusion, with never a dull moment.

Reviewed by Romana Drew October 31, 2020.















SG1 in 1969

Lieutenant Hammond

1969




Season 2 Episode 21

Directed by Charles Correll. Written by Brad Wright.

Originally aired
Sky One March 5, 1999
Showtime March 5, 1999

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Gary Jones, Teryl Rothery, and Don S. Davis.

With Alex Zahara as Michael, Aaron Pearl as Lieutenant George Hammond, Amber Rothwell as Jenny, Pamela Perry as 'Future' Cassandra, Glynis Davies as Young Catherine Langford, and Fred Henderson as Major Robert Thornbird.

A solar flare hits the wormhole, and SG1 ends up back in the gate room in 1969, standing under a missile.

They are taken into custody as Soviet spies. A young Lieutenant George Hammond helps them escape. However, they're still stuck in 1969, long before anyone knows how to operate the Stargate, or even where it is.

As time travel stories go, this one works well and is quite enjoyable. There are, of course, the typical, or should I say 'required' paradoxes. When General Hammond sees the cut on Sam's hand, he gives her a note he found in her pocket in 1969. Of course, he gave her that note in 1969, so he shouldn't still have it.

And, in the future, Cassandra is waiting to send the crew back to the correct time because Sam gave her a heads up many years ago, which she couldn't do if she hadn't already done it.

Jack uses a Zat'nik'tel on two boxes of supplies, which conveniently disintegrate on the third blast, just like people. How did the Zat know the difference between the boxes and the truck bed or surrounding inanimate material?

Aaron Pearl does a great job as a young Hammond. I am pretty sure Don Davis does his voice.

This is a quick-paced, fun episode.

Reviewed by Romana Drew November 1, 2020.















Sam, Hathor, and a Goa'uld symbiont

Dr. Raully

Out of Mind




Season 2 Episode 22

Directed by Martin Wood. Story by Jonathan Glassner & Brad Wright. Teleplay by Jonathan Glassner. Excerpts by Hart Hanson, Katharyn Powers, Robert C. Cooper, James Crocker, Jonathan Glassner, Brad Wright, Terry Curtis Fox, David Bennett Carren, J. Larry Carroll, Michael Greenburg & Jarrad Paul

Originally aired
Sky One March 12, 1999
Showtime March 12, 1999

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Gary Jones, Teryl Rothery, and Don S. Davis.

With Suanne Braun as Hathor, Tom Butler as Major General Trofsky, Samantha Ferris as Dr. Raully.

Archive footage: Armin Shimerman as Anteaus, Frida Betrani as Lya, Elizabeth Hoffman as Catherine Langford, Keene Curtis as Ernest Littlefield, Tony Amendola as Master Bra'tac, Peter Williams as Apophis, Alexis Cruz as Skaara / Klorel, Douglas Arthurs as Heru'ur.

Jack wakes after seventy-nine years in a cryogenic chamber. Everyone he knew is dead. The same thing happens to Daniel and Sam. After three weeks in a coma, Teal'c wakes in the SGC, where the rest of SG1 are believed dead.

Out of Mind is the final episode of Season 2. It reviews some of the main stories of the past season and begins the set-up for Season 3.

The flashbacks are important to the story. They do get a little long in a couple of places, but not to the point of slowing the pace unnecessarily.

Jack, Sam, and Daniel are obviously in a Goa'uld facility, but why and how takes some time to figure out.

Our protagonists have a much easier time sneaking around the Goa'uld buildings than they should have because of the short walls in front of all the actual walls, which offers intruders perfect places to hide when Jaffa, or even Goa'uld, come marching down the halls as if they owned the world. The Goa'uld never manage to correct this obvious design flaw.

The Goa'uld symbionts are always a bit of a problem. The thing Hathor holds is so big that it simply couldn't fit along someone's spine without causing a giant hump. Human skin is tightly adhered to the underlying muscle. Nothing can easily crawl around between the skin and the muscle. When surgical removal is attempted, the symbionts are protrayed as filimants intertwining with the spine and brain, but when they transfer from one host to another, they are evil worm-like beings.

How can something that small have enough brain power to control a person. Lots of animals are born with complex innate behaviors, like nest building in birds, but the Goa'uld symbionts have language and history, and a detailed knowledge of anatomy, physiology, and healing techniques. It strains my ability to suspend my disbelief.

Who did this to SG1 and why is revealed just before "To be Continued" pops on the screen. When originally aired, viewers had to wait three months to watch the next episode. Since I have the episodes on disk, I get to watch it tomorrow.

Reviewed by Romana Drew November 11, 2020.









Around the Galaxy
Season 3















The demise of Jack

Hathor

Into the Fire




Season 3 Episode 1

Directed by Martin Wood. Written by Brad Wright.

Originally aired
Sky One June 25, 1999
Showtime June 25, 1999

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Teryl Rothery, Gary Jones, and Don S. Davis.

With Tony Amendola as Master Bra'tac, Suanne Braun as Hathor, Tom Butler as Major General Trofsky, Colin Cunningham as Major Paul Davis, Samantha Ferris as Dr. Raully, and Steve Makaj as Colonel Makepeace.

Hathor captures Daniel, Jack, and Sam and implants Jack with a symbiote. On Chulak, Teal'c attempts to raise an army to rescue SG1 and eventually free the Jaffa. Colonel Makepeace returns with news from the Tok'ra.

Into the Fire is the conclusion of Out of Mind. It's an exciting, action-packed story full of twists, turns, and location changes. But it can get a bit confusing. It also sets up political changes on Chulak and beginning of a Jaffa rebellion.

Once again Daniel becomes the damsel in destress. Although, he usually he appears to die. This time he is injured and has to limp around for much of the episode.

Hathor's demise is especially satisfactory. She really does get her frozen just deserts. Note: desert pronounced dessert means a deserved reward or punishment.

Reviewed by Romana Drew November 12, 2020.















Seth

Sam on the warpath

Seth




Season 3 Episode 2

Directed by William Corcoran. Written by Jonathan Glassner.

Originally aired
Sky One July 2, 1999
Showtime July 2, 1999

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Teryl Rothery, Gary Jones, and Don S. Davis.

With Carmen Argenziano as Jacob Carter / Selmak, Rob Murray Duncan as Seth, Mitchell Kosterman as Special Agent James Hamner, Stuart O'Connell as Tommy Levinson, Lucia Walters as Disciple, Greg Michaels as Jason Levinson, and Rob Morton as Sheriff.

Jacob Carter/Selmak gates to Earth looking for Setesh, a Goa'uld system lord who has been missing for thousands of years. The Tok'ra believe he was trapped on Earth when the gate was buried and is still in hiding.

Daniel finds evidence of a cult leader in Washington State that may be Setesh, now calling himself Seth Fargough.

Seth's disciples have been brainwashed using a Nish'ta, a virus. The virus can be killed with an electrical shock, rendering the person immune to further brainwashing. Sam build an earplug that will administer an electrical shock when needed. Everyone else gets a blast from a Zat gun.

I find it hard to believe an earplug can carry enough charge that a shock in the ear will affect the entire body. If it did, it would probably destroy that ear. Why didn't Seth notice these earplugs and remove them? Especially since SG1's clothes were apparently removed while they slept.

Seth has a lot of Goa'uld technology, dozens of Zat'nik'tels, a functioning Kara kesh, and a Nish'ta machine. How did he has amass, or preserved, all his stuff while stranded on Earth for several thousand years.

Rob Murray Duncan does a great job playing Seth as a narcissistic megalomaniac, but, in the end, he's no match for Sam.

Reviewed by Romana Drew November 17, 2020















Yu, Nirrti, and Jack with Cronus on the bed.

Thor

Fair Game




Season 3 Episode 3

Directed by Martin Wood. Written by Robert C. Cooper.

Originally aired
Sky One July 9, 1999
Showtime July 9, 1999

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Teryl Rothery, Gary Jones, and Don S. Davis.

With Michael David Simms as Secretary of Defense Arthur Simms, Ron Halder as Cronus, Jacqueline Samuda as Nirrti, Vince Crestejo as Yu-huang Shang Ti, T.M. Sandulak as Sergeant Ziplinski.

Sam gets a much-deserved promotion. When Jack steps forward to say a few words, he is beamed up to Thor's ship.

The Goa'uld System Lords are about to flatten Earth because the Tau'ri killed Hathor. To prevent this, Thor is attempting to add Earth to the Protected Planets Treaty the Asgard have with the Goa'uld. But Earth must host the negotiations.

Three Goa'uld arrive, Nirrti, Cronus, and Yu. As soon as Jack opens his mouth, the System Lords storm out of the room. After that, things go south.

This is a good, fun episode. It moves right along with intrigue and humor.

Nirrti, Cronus, and Yu have either been seen before or will be seen again in future stories. Throughout the episode, they are scheming and narcissistic but not completely evil. They have a coalition of sorts, some semblance of justice, or at least revenge, and limited respect for keeping promises.

If you listen carefully, Michael Shanks is the voice of Thor.

Reviewed by Romana Drew November 20, 2020.















Dead Goa'uld in Daniel's closet.

Daniel

Legacy


Legacy

Season 3 Episode 4

Directed by Peter DeLuise. Written by Tor Alexander Valenza.

Originally aired
Sky One July 16, 1999
Showtime July 16, 1999

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Teryl Rothery, Gary Jones, and Don S. Davis.

With Kevin McNulty as Dr. Warner and Eric Schneider as Dr. MacKenzie.

SG1 comes across nine dead Goa'uld in a chamber on PY3-948. Daniel picks up a tablet and page turning device, and they all head home. Whereupon Daniel goes bonkers. Blame it all on Ma'chello.

Michael Shanks gets to stretch his acting skills as a hebephrenic schizophrenic, padded cell and all. But that is just the beginning.

This episode has good acting and an intriguing story, but it is difficult to watch Daniel suffer as he does.

I have an issue with the phrase, "Well, it's a theory, not a proof," and the continued use of theory in place of hypothesis. In simple terms, a hypothesis is an educated guess. A theory is based on extensive data and research and has withstood both the test of time and widespread review. A proof is a piece of evidence that establishes the truth of something.

All this may seem a bit nit-picky, but theory is too often misused, leading to the belief that theories are just ideas that may or may not be accurate. In truth, they are explainations for that have undergone extensive testing.

I also wonder why they use such huge syringes. If a doctor came at me with a 10cc syringe, I would be inclined to find myself a different doctor, or at least take my leave before he had a chance to jab me.

Reviewed by Romana Drew November 23, 2020.















Merrin, Sam and the Naguadah reactor.

Solon

Learning Curve




Season 3 Episode 5

Directed by Martin Wood. Written by Heather E. Ash.

Originally aired
Sky One July 23, 1999
Showtime July 23, 1999

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Teryl Rothery, Gary Jones, and Don S. Davis.

With Andrew Airlie as Kalan, Britt Irvin as Merrin, Lachlan Murdoch as Tomin, Stephanie Shea as Solen.

While Daniel and others are busy studying the Orbanian culture, they are asked to explain their findings to Urrone, pre-teen kids who both learn and understand easily. Tomin, one of the kids, leaves to undergo the Arverium. When Teal'c and Daniel find him, his mind is empty of all knowledge.

The Organians are an interesting, although somewhat illogical, culture. Each Urrone has a finite number of nanites to give to the adults, so they can learn what the Urrone has learned. Leaving the Urrone without any knowledge or the ability to assimilate new nanites. That leaves a lot of questions unanswered.

Where are the children who are not Urrone? Presumably, they are given nanites so they can learn. Is there a source of age-appropriate nanites, or do three-year old's get information on Naquadah generators?

The show implies that adults can't learn anything unless they receive a nanite, so how do they learn the names of new children, the way to a newly built structure, and where the toilet is?

The whole nanite thing trashes the idea of free will. Someone needs to cook and clean. Are those people given the same nanites as everyone else? If not, who decides?

Even if the society is full of holes, the story is a good one. The performances of Britt Irvin and Lachlan Murdoch are perfect and strengthen the episode.

Reviewed by Romana Drew November 29, 2020.















Sam and Sam

Apophis

Point of View




Season 3 Episode 6

Directed by Peter DeLuise. Story by? Jonathan Glassner, Brad Wright, Robert C. Cooper and Tor Alexander Valenza. Teleplay by? Jonathan Glassner and Brad Wright.

Originally aired
Sky One July 30, 1999
Showtime July 30, 1999

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Machael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Teryl Rothery, Gary Jones, and Don S. Davis.

With Jay Acovone as Major Charles Kawalsky, Peter Williams as Apophis.

Without warning, Sam and Kawalsky from an alternate universe, use the Quantum Mirror from P3R-233 to gate to this reality because Apophis is destroying their world. They are captured and sent to the SGC. If they return to their universe, they will be killed. But Sam, the alternate universe Sam, will die if she stays here. The only hope is to return to the alternate world and ask the Asgard to save that Earth.

Point of View is another exploration of an alternate universe where the Goa'uld have conquered Earth. Apophis is back and is Teal'c as his First Prime. In the alternate universe, Jack is dead, Kawalsky is alive, and Daniel is nowhere to be found.

Alternate universes are interesting, make for great stories, and some scientists take the idea seriously. I just can't believe that a new universe is created every time someone on Earth makes a decision. That delves into the world of magic and fantasy, where words and thoughts have the power to change physical objects.

I am very far from an expert on the multiverse theory (or hypothesis). There doesn't seem to be much agreement among those who are experts. But there isn't any reason why alternate universes should resemble ours in general, let alone in specifics.

There is also no reason why having two Samantha Carters should make one sick.

Still, this is a good story with lots of action and excitement.

Reviewed by Romana Drew December 1, 2020.















Boch zapping Sam

Boch and SG1

Deadman Switch




Season 3 Episode 7

Directed by Martin Wood. Written by Robert C. Cooper.

Originally aired
Sky One August 6, 1999
Showtime August 6, 1999

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Teryl Rothery, Gary Jones, and Don S. Davis.

With Sam J. Jones as Aris Boch and Mark Holden as Korra.

Looking for their downed UAV, SG1 encounters Aris Boch, a bounty hunter. Boch is after an errant Goa'uld to sell to Sokar, but he won't pass up the opportunity to add SG1 to his catch. It turns out that the Goa'uld is actually a Tok'ra.

Boch isn't really a bad guy. He's just a bounty hunter looking for revenge.

This could be a really great episode, but Boch doesn't work as well as the character could. Although Sam J. Jones plays him with great enthusiasm and a little tongue in cheek, the character lacks depth and charisma.

Also, Teal'c's willingness to be taken hostage just doesn't sit right. That should be a last-ditch solution. I would have preferred a more active conclusion, big fight, or something. Perhaps, even forcing Teal'c into the ship as a hostage.

Reviewed by Romana Drew December 3, 2020















Unas

The Canon taking Teal'c for a swim

Demons




Season 3 Episode 8

Directed by Peter DeLuise. Written by Carl Binder.

Originally aired
Sky One August 13, 1999
Showtime August 13, 1999

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Teryl Rothery, Gary Jones, and Don S. Davis.

With David McNally as Simon, A.C. Peterson as Canon, Laura Mennell as Mary, Rick Morwick as Unas, and John R. Taylor as Elder.

On a primitive planet, SG1 finds a young girl, Mary, chained to a post. They free her. Before long, an Unas/Goa'uld stomps by demanding sacrifices be waiting for him tomorrow. He leaves, and the Canon arrives with a group of friends. The Canon uses a ring to call a lightning strike that knocks out SG1.

In previous episodes, the primitive worlds came from times before the advent of Christianity. But this world is stuck in the Dark Ages. And the Unas serves Sokar. Rather than doing the typical Goa'uld bit of playing God, Sokar has set himself up as the devil.

There are many unpleasant rituals in this society, drilling holes in heads, drowning people, and so forth. But it does set up several future episodes. We learn that the Unas are a species, and the Sokar plays Satan.

With all the humans around, why does the Goa'uld stay inside the Unas? True, Unas are tough critters, but most Goa'uld seem to prefer humans. And there are plenty of humans on this world to choose from.

The episode is well-acted and well-paced, but it is a bit dark and unpleasant. Watch for a screaming Peter DeLuise running past the camera.

Reviewed by Romana Drew December 7, 2020.















Apophis - super sized

Sam's new look

Rules of Engagement




Season 3 Episode 9

Directed by William Gereghty. Written by Terry Curtis Fox.

Originally aired
Sky One August 20, 1999
Showtime August 20, 1999

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Teryl Rothery, Gary Jones, and Don S. Davis.

With Peter Williams as Apophis, Aaron Craven as Captain Kyle Rogers, Dion Johnstone as Captain Nelson, Jesse Moss as Lieutenant J. Hibbard, and Josh Byer as Sergeant.

SG1 steps through the Stargate to find SG11 battling a Jaffa army. They come to the rescue, but are captured. Nothing is what it seems, SG11 is dead, the weapons are not lethal, these people are not from Earth, and no one has a symbiont. When someone is killed by Teal'c's staff weapon, they haul out the real weapons and start killing each other.

A bunch of young men are left on a planet to train as soldiers for Apophis. When all the Jaffa leave, they continue to train for months on end. This is another situation that works until you look a little closer. They fight and train, but not farm or hunt, so where does the food come from. Apophis may have been providing food while he was alive, but he's gone. Shouldn't they be short on supplies

All those young men and not a woman in sight. Yet, none of them is at all interested when Sam shows up.

The episode moves along just fine. There are problems to solve and lots of action. It even has a massive holographic statue of Apophis in all his megalomaniac glory.

Reviewed by Romana Drew December 8, 2020.















Sha're/Amaunet

Kasuf and Daniel

Forever in a Day




Season 3 Episode 10

Directed by Peter DeLuise. Written by Jonathan Glassner.

Originally aired
Sky One October 8, 1999
Showtime August 20, 1999

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Teryl Rothery, Gary Jones, and Don S. Davis.

With Erick Avari as Kasuf, Vaitiare Hirshon as Sha're / Amaunet, and Jason Schombing as Dr. Robert Rothman.

SG1 and friends set out to rescue a group of Abydonians held on P8X-873 by Amaunet. They arrive, guns blazing, and engage the Jaffa. All goes well until Daniel confronts Amaunet/Sha're. In predictable Goa'uld fashion, she trains her kara kesh on his forehead, and down he goes. Teal'c kills her, saving Daniel.

Distraught over his wife's death, Daniel leaves the SGC.

This episode is all about Daniel, his grieving, and his hallucinations. Except for Sha're being in the scene, it's hard to tell what is real and what isn't. This type of story can become overly melodramatic, but Michael Shanks and Vaitiare Hirshon carry it off with sensitivity and believability. Although the episode is a little slow and repetitious in places, it is well-acted and directed.

The episode introduces Robert Rothman, a source of comic relief. It also sets up the search for the Harcesis, Sha're's child, the son of Amaunet and Apophis.

Reviewed by Romana Drew December 10, 2020.















Daniel and Ke'ra

Hammond and the team

Past and Present




Season 3 Episode 11

Directed by William Gereghty. Written by Tor Alexander Valenza.

Originally aired
Sky One October 15, 1999
Showtime October 15, 1999

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Teryl Rothery, Gary Jones, and Don S. Davis.

With Megan Leitch as Ke'ra, Marya Delver as Layale, and Jason Gray-Stanford as Orner.

SG1 gates to a world with no children and no old people. And no one remembers anything that happened, even who they are, before the Vorlix, a year or so ago.

The head of the transitional government is a woman named Ke'ra. She seems genuinely concerned for these people, but she knows way too much science for this society. It isn't long before they discover Linea's diary.

Do memories make a person? Ke'ra is loving and wise. Linea is the destroyer of worlds, an evil genius searching for the fountain of youth. When Ke'ra remembers who she really is, she tries to kill herself. I expected her to welcome her old self back and continue her nefarious ways. Apparently, she still has positive memories of her life as Ke'ra.

I also don't quite believe a drug that makes old people young while gumming up only the memory circuits in the brain. Wouldn't it also gum up everything else? Of course, then everyone would be young imbeciles or dead, and there wouldn't be much of a story.

Megan Leitch does a fine job as Ke'ra/Linea. But she lacks the power of Bonnie Bartlett's Linea in season 2, episode 3, Prisoners.

Reviewed by Romana Drew December 11, 2020.















Daniel and Ke'ra

Hammond and the team

Jolinar's Memories




Season 3 Episode 12

Directed by Peter DeLuise. Written by Sonny Wareham & Daniel Stashower.

Originally aired
Sky One October 22, 1999
Showtime October 22, 1999

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Teryl Rothery, Gary Jones, and Don S. Davis.

With Carmen Argenziano as Jacob Carter / Selmak, JR Bourne as Martouf / Lantash, Bob Dawson as Bynarr, Dion Johnstone as Na'onak, Peter Williams as Apophis, Peter Kent as Kintac, David Palffy as Sokar, Daniel Bacon as Technician, Eli Gabay as Jumar, Tanya Reid as Rosha / Jolinar of Malkshur, and Christine Kennedy as Young Samantha Carter.

The Tok'ra send Martoof to the SGC to ask Sam to help rescue her father. Jacob/Selmak has been captured by Sokar and sent to hell. Since Jolinar is the only person to have ever escaped this brand of hell, Martoof brings a device to help Sam remember how Jolinar did it.

Teal'c waits in a Tel'tak while Sam, Daniel, Jack, and Martoof ride escape pods to the surface of Netu, where Sokar sends his prisoners.

As a representation of hell, Netu isn't bad. There's fire and steam everywhere. The surface is unlivable, the caves are dark, and there are lots and lots of people. What do they eat?

Pay attention to Na'onak, the second in command. His voice should be recognizable.

Sokar has a strong resemblance to Palpatine, both in his manner of dress and his penchant for taking over the galaxy.

Netu is an unpleasant place, and everyone gets tortured, which makes this not the most pleasant episode to watch. But it gives insight into the relationship between Martoof and Jolinar, as well as how a dead, down and out Goa'uld might just reclaim some of his past glory.

It ends in a cliff hanger. So, on to the next episode.

Reviewed by Romana Drew December 13, 2020.















Apophis

Sokar

The Devil You Know




Season 3 Episode 13

Originally aired
Sky One October 29, 1999
Showtime October 29, 1999

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Teryl Rothery, Gary Jones, and Don S. Davis.

With Carmen Argenziano as Jacob Carter / Selmak, JR Bourne as Martouf / Lantash, William deVry as Aldwin, Bob Dawson as Bynarr, Peter Williams as Apophis, Peter Kent as Kintac, David Palffy as Sokar, Eli Gabay as Jumar, Tanya Reid as Jolinar, Christine Kennedy as Young Samantha Carter, and Dillon Moen as Charlie O'Neill.

The escape failed. Sam, Daniel, Jack, and Martoof have Jacob, but Apophis has them. And, they are still on Netu. And, they all get tortured again.

Apophis wants an audience with Sokar, now on a ship in orbit. The Tok'ra launch a device into the core of the Netu to destroy the moon and take out Sokar's ship at the same time, killing everyone in twelve minutes.

There is a lot of excitement in this episode, but the darkness and torture make it difficult to watch. Like the previous episode, most of the memories the torture dredges up do not further this plot. They are too often things the viewer already knows.

The ring transporter sends a matter stream in a straight line to another ring transporter, either from the moon Netu to the planet Delmak, where Sokar has his palace. Or from Netu to Sokar's ship in orbit.

The moon to the ship I get. The ship can orbit directly above the transporter on the surface. But going from a fixed point on the moon to a fixed point on the planet it orbits is a bit tricky. Most of the time that would require going through the moon or the planet or both. The moon spins on its axis. The planet spins on its axis. And the moon orbits the planet. A straight line between the two locations would seldom be through empty space.

Note: Moons do not actually orbit planets in the way most people visualize. The moon and planet both orbit the sun. The planet's greater mass perturbates the moon's orbit. This video explains it

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3cJ3AemeUFM

Reviewed by Romana Drew December 14, 2020















An alien

Jack just hanging around

Foothold




Season 3 Episode 14

Directed by Andy Mikita. Written by Heather E. Ash.

Originally aired
Sky One November 5, 1999
Showtime November 5, 1999

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Teryl Rothery, Gary Jones, and Don S. Davis.

With Tom McBeath as Colonel Harry Maybourne, Colin Cunningham as Major Paul Davis, Alex Zahara as Alien Leader.

SG1 gates home from a very rainy planet. They are greeted at gunpoint and taken to the infirmary, where they are sedated. Teal'c wakes to find Dr. Fraiser talking to a couple of aliens. In fact, SGC is overrun with aliens.

Maybourne to the rescue - sort of.

The aliens look like they're wearing protective suits. Even their hands look like gloves with claws. A mimetic imaging device stuck on the outside of their clothing makes them look like humans. When Sam uses the mimetic, it has to be placed on her skin.

This alien's imaging scheme, which is not uncommon in sci fi, has some problems. The aliens only look like humans. They are. larger, and their hands have claws, so handling objects should cause a bit of confusion and imaging difficulties.

Although the Slitheen compression field (Doctor Who) also has believability issues, it at least forces the larger bodies into a human shape. So, manipulating objects isn't a problem

Why claws? Big claws make the handling of small objects rather tricky.

Syringes again! Really, four milliliters into Sam's butt. That's way too much fluid to put into a muscle. Into a vein, yes, but not into a muscle. Someone's posterior isn't the best place to find veins. Watch closely. Dr. Fraiser doesn't empty the syringe.

This is a fun episode. Maybourne adds just the right touch of comic relief and frustrating stupidity.

Reviewed by Romana Drew December 16, 2020















Skaara speaking as Klorel

Lya

Pretense




Season 3 Episode 15

Directed by David Warry-Smith. Written by Katharyn Powers.

Originally aired
Sky One January 19, 2000
Showtime January 21, 2000

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, and Don S. Davis.

With Alexis Cruz as Skaara / Klorel, Frida Betrani as Lya, Marie Stillin as High Chancellor Travell, Garwin Sanford as Narim, Kevin Durand as Zipacna.

After blowing a couple of Goa'uld motherships from space, the Tollan capture Skaara/Klorel. Skaara begs for freedom. The Tollan hold a trial, inviting SG1, Zipacna and his Jaffa, and Lya, to participate. The combination of Humans, Tollans, Goa'uld, and Nox is interesting.

Sam and Teal'c see Zipacna's Jaffa sabotaging the Tollan planetary defense system prior to invasion and conquest. Arrogant and self-confident, the Tollans don't even investigate the threat.

Trials can be interesting, but they can also be tedious and obvious. This one covers concepts of slavery and the value and rights of technologically or intellectually superior species over less advanced species. Philosophically interesting stuff.

Fortunately, the trial isn't all there is to the episode. The Tollans unwavering belief in their superiority, the Goa'ulds intent on conquest, and the Nox's special skills all combine to make for an interesting sub plot. And an exciting, action packed conclusion.

Kevin Durand does a great job as a slimy, conniving Zipacna. I expected his comeuppance to be prolonged, but Teal's offs him in a matter of seconds. Which, is equally satisfying.

Although Zipacna argues that the Goa'uld cannot live without a host. That isn't true. Goa'uld can swim around in the water, or at least they do in future episodes. They also get carried around in jars. So, Klorel could live outside a host, he just couldn't do much.

Reviewed by Romana Drew December 17, 2020.















Urgo

Yum Dessert

Urgo




Season 3 Episode 16

Directed by Peter DeLuise. Written by Tor Alexander Valenza.

Originally aired
Sky One January 26, 2000
Showtime January 28, 2000

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Teryl Rothery, Gary Jones, and Don S. Davis.

With Dom DeLuise as Urgo / Togar.

The MALP shows a tropical beach with palm trees. But when SG1 returns from paradise, they have no memories of the world. They do, however, have a very real and annoying hitchhiker that no one else can see or hear.

Therefore, we meet Urgo.

Dom DeLuise is the star of this episode. His Urgo is both charming and irritating at the same time. There are many more words to describe Urgo; infuriating, grating, exasperating, bothersome, but you get the idea.

Both the director, Dom's son Peter, and writer, Tor Alexander Valenza, deserve credit for keeping this episode fresh and funny. There is just enough Ergo. Any more would leave the viewer wanting to chuck a hammer through the TV screen.

Reviewed by Romana Drew, December 18, 2020.















Jack and Laira

Fire Rain

A Hundred Days




Season 3 Episode 17

Directed by David Warry-Smith. Story by V. C. JamesTeleplay by Brad Wright.

Originally aired
Sky One February 14, 2000
Showtime February 4, 2000

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, and Don S. Davis.

With Michele Greene as Laira, Julie Patzwald as Naytha, Shane Meier as Garan, and Marcel Maillard as Paynan.

SG1 goes to Edora to trade for Naquadah, which is in the soil. Before they can make any kind of deal, the fire rain, a meteor shower, turns deadly, and they all run for the gate - except O'Neill. He and Laria head for the caves where her son is hiding from falling asteroids.

When the meteors stop, the gate is gone.

This is a quiet little story about Jack's frustration and final acceptance of his fate. Stuck on Eudora, he becomes part of the society and even falls in love.

On the other side of the gate, Sam and Teal'c mount a most improbable rescue.

Fortunately, the rescue only takes three months. Had they waited for the Tollan ship to get to Eudora in a year or so, Jack might have had a much more difficult decision, given his relationship with Laira.

This is a well-crafted episode. It is somewhat predictable but never boring.

Reviewed by Romana Drew December 22, 2020.















Maybourne with stolen technology

More stolen technology, looking a bit like a zero point module.

Shades of Grey




Season 3 Episode 18

Directed by Martin Wood. Written by Jonathan Glassner.

Originally aired
Sky One February 9, 2000
Showtime February 11, 2000

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Teryl Rothery, Gary Jones, and Don S. Davis.

With Tom McBeath as Colonel Harry Maybourne, Steve Makaj as Colonel Makepeace, Marie Stillin as High Chancellor Travell, Christian Bocher as Major Newman, and Linnea Sharples as Lieutenant Clare Tobias.

First, Jack steals from the Tollans, then he tells off Hammond and everyone else. Forced into retirement, he is ripe for Maybourne's shenanigans.

For a while, it looks as if Jack may be looking for an exit from the show. He even trashes his friendship with Daniel.

Someone is stealing technology from the Tollans, Asgard, Nox, and other advanced races. Not only do they want their stuff back, but they want the perpetrators apprehended. And they get their wish, almost. Maybourne oozes his way to safety. But never fear, he'll pop up again.

The events of this episode play out differently in future episodes.

Richard Dean Anderson does a great job of making everyone believe he's lost it. Although the time required for Maybourne to recruit and trust him seems too short by a long shot. But then Maybourne isn't always the brightest star in the sky.

Reviewed by Romana Drew December 23, 2020.















Jack, Sam, and Daniel in cages.

The Bedrosian Stargate

New Ground




Season 3 Episode 19

Directed by Chris McMullin. Written by Heather E. Ash.

Originally aired
Sky One February 16, 2000
Showtime February 18, 2000

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Teryl Rothery, Gary Jones, and Don S. Davis.

With Richard Ian Cox as Nyan, Daryl Shuttleworth as Commander Rigar, Desiree Zurowski as Parey, and Jennifer Copping as Mallin.

The Bedrosians unearth the Stargate. In a random trial of gate addresses, SGC connects with that gate. Sam sends a MALP through and talks to Nyan.

Nyan welcomes the visitors from Earth, but Mallin runs for help. Soon the military shows up, and they get arrested.

This episode attempts to prove that military intelligence is an oxymoron as if that were in doubt. Apparently, when irrefutable evidence contradicts established beliefs, the best course of action is to destroy and deny the evidence.

Commander Rigar is rigid, unimaginative, and insensitive, denying the obvious. Although he lacks depth and complexity, he is believable.

I do wonder how Rigar came up with the exact number of cages so quickly. Since he believes there are four infiltrators, why does he only have three cages? If he does catch the fourth one, where will he put him?

The best part of the exciting conclusion is Nyan's fate. He isn't left in a world that will never forgive his blasphemy, nor is he killed off to save him from that fate. He gets a chance to live a good life.

Reviewed by Romana Drew December 27, 2020



















Oma Desala

Daniel, Bra'tak and the monk

Maternal Instinct




Season 3 Episode 20

Directed by Peter F. Woeste. Written by Robert C. Cooper

Originally aired
Sky One February 25, 2000
Showtime February 25, 2000

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Teryl Rothery, Gary Jones, and Don S. Davis.

With Tony Amendola as Master Bra'tac, Terry Chen as Monk, Aaron Douglas as Moac, Steve Bacic as Major Coburn, D. Harlan Cutshall as Jaffa Commander, and Carla Boudreau as Oma Desala

Apophis, commanding Sokar's forces, attacks Chulak, searching for the Harcesis. To escape, Bra'tac gates to Earth. Of course, the Harcesis isn't on Chulak. He is on Keb, where ever that is.

Together, Bra'tac and Daniel find a gate address that may be Keb. There, they find a temple and a most enigmatic young monk. "If you immediately know the candlelight is fire, then the meal was cooked a long time ago."

It's not long before Apophis sends hordes of Jaffa. Backed into a corner, SG1 doesn't stand a chance.

This is our first introduction to Oma Desala and the idea of ascended beings or Ancients. However, at this point, Oma is only a strange and powerful but equally enigmatic alien. Although, we do get a glimpse of ascension when the monk dies.

Since Oma has ascended to another plane of existence, why does she have to go through the Stargate? No matter, this is a good episode with great special effects. Perhaps a good end to this tumultuous year.

Reviewed by Romana Drew December 31, 2020.















Daniel and the skull

Nicholas Ballard and Daniel

Crystal Skull




Season 3 Episode 21

Directed by Brad Turner. Story by Michael Greenburg and Jarrad Paul. Teleplay by Brad Wright.

Originally aired
Sky One March 3, 2000
Showtime March 3, 2000

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Teryl Rothery, Gary Jones, and Don S. Davis.

With Jan Rubes as Nicholas Ballard, Jason Schombing as Dr. Robert Rothman, Dan Shea as Sgt. Siler, and Russell Roberts as Psychiatrist.

SG1 discovers a crystal skull. Daniel looks into its eyes and disappears. He isn't really gone, he's invisible and able to walk through walls and people.

The team brings the skull back to Stargate Command. Unable to figure out what happened to Daniel, they ask his grandfather, Nicholas Ballard. Nick found a similar skull and is now in a mental institution.

This is a bit of an offshoot of Indiana Jones - almost. The skull is alien, and it has mystical powers. But the rest of the story goes in a completely different direction.

Crystal skulls are real and were initially thought to be of pre-Columbian manufacture. Several are in museums. However, microscopic examination and analysis of the stone shows that they are all of modem (20th century) manufacture.

Crystals do have a kind of grain, but since the skull is basically a ball, only limited parts can be cut "against the grain." Imagine a cricket ball.

Jan Rubes does a wonderfully convincing role as Daniel's grandfather. He is lovable and eccentric.

While no one can see or hear him, Daniel walks through a couple of walls, leaving the viewer with that pesky old question. Why doesn't he fall through the floor? How did Daniel get from SGC to the hospital? Did he ride in a car sitting on someone's lap, unbeknownst to them? When the car accelerated or braked, how did he stay in?

All that aside, this is a great episode.

Reviewed by Romana Drew January 5, 2021.















Oops!

Jack and a very sick Thor

Nemesis




Season 3 Episode 22

Directed by Martin Wood. Written by Robert C. Cooper.

Originally aired
Sky One March 8, 2000
Showtime March 10, 2000

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Teryl Rothery, Gary Jones, and Don S. Davis.

With Colin Cunningham as Major Paul Davis.

While Daniel is laid up with appendicitis, the rest of the team gets a vacation. - almost. Without any warning, Thor beams Jack to his ship. Thor is close to death, and his ship, the Biliskner, is overrun with Replicators. In fact, Thor's planet is about to fall to the Replicators.

And, to make things worse, if the replicators manage to land the Biliskner, Earth will suffer the same fate.

This is a great episode and a frustrating end to the season. When originally aired, we had to wait nearly four months for the conclusion. However, via the magic of DVD's, I can watch the conclusion tomorrow. Almost watched it today, but I didn't have enough time.

At first, it seems like there should be some good plot reason for keeping Daniel at the SGC, but no. Michael Shanks really did have appendicitis.

Sam and Teal'c come up with a daring way to defeat the Replicators. It isn't at all easy or safe, but it works - except . . .

The Replicators are the new nemesis for SG1. The Goa'uld are still around, but they are not the threat they used to be, so a more difficult adversary is introduced.

Reviewed by Romana Drew January 10, 2021.





New Cultures
Season 4







The O'Neill

Jack and and the Replicators



The Biliskner

Small Victories




Season 4 Episode 1.

Directed by Martin Wood. Written by Robert C. Cooper.

Originally aired
Sky One June 30, 2000
Showtime June 30, 2000

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, and Don S. Davis.

With Colin Cunningham as Major Paul Davis, Gary Jones as Sgt. Walter Harriman, Teryl Rothery as Dr. Janet Fraiser, Dan Shea as Sgt. Siler, Yurij Kis as Yuri, Dmitry Chepovetsky as Boris.

When the second Stargate is finally installed in the SGC, Sam, Jack, and Teal'c gate home. The Biliskner burned up on reentry killing all the Replicators, so all is well. Then a Russian sub gets hijacked by mechanical bugs.

The Russians saw the Biliskner burn up and demand to know what happened. Then Thor arrives, now recovered from his injuries, and asks for help to save his world.

While Jack and Teal'c tackle the bugs on the ship, Sam goes off to save the Asgard, and Daniel stays in the command center, apparently, still on the injured list.

At this point, the episode separates into two very different stories. Jack and Teal'c battle bugs while Sam and Thor have more intellectual discussions. It's an excellent story-telling strategy. Bug zapping can get repetitious, and theoretical discussions can get boring if they go on too long. This episode finds just the right mix.

Thor describes the Replicators as very intellegent with a drive to turn everything into more Replicators. That takes energy. Assuming they get energy from consuming things, once they have converted all matter into Replicators, where do they get the energy to do anything else? How they communicate and organize is explained sufficiently, but not where they get the energy to move about.

Small Victories is an exciting opening for the new season. It feels as if season 4 will concentrate on the Replicators, but that doesn't happen. These villians fade into the background for a long while. But never fear, eventually they come back with a vengence.

Reviewed by Romana Drew January 10, 2021.















Anise / Freya

Sam with the Ataniks' armband.

Upgrades




Season 4 Episode 3

Directed by Martin Wood Written by David Rich
Originally aired
Sky One July 14, 2000
Showtime July 14, 2000

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, and Don S. Davis.

With Vanessa Angel as Anise / Freya, Teryl Rothery as Dr. Janet Fraiser, Dan Shea as Sgt. Siler.

Anise comes to the SGC with three Ataniks armbands that enhance physical and mental abilities. She puts them on Jack, Sam, and Daniel with the assurance that they are harmless. Dr. Fraiser becomes concerned and tries to take them off, to no avail. Then Anise asks for help destroying Apophis' new mothership.

This is a way of giving the team superpowers, such as reading books in a matter of seconds, lifting hundreds of pounds, and running faster than the eye can see. However, like all these McGuffins, it doesn't stand a close look.

Jack bench presses six hundred pounds as if it didn't weigh anything at all. There are a few people who can do that. But it takes several years to strengthen the bones, muscles, and ligaments to withstand that force. A virus can't do that in a couple of days.

Even if nerve impulses and muscle contraction could be speeded up several times, it wouldn't be fast enough to run faster than the eye can see or fast enough to get through an oscillating force field. And at some point, you run into the physical limits of electrochemical nervous transmissions. Muscle contractions and relaxations are caused by chemical reactions. There is a point at which simple physics makes any faster contraction and relaxation impossible.

Still, it's a great story.

Upgrades was filmed at Burnaby Mountain Park in British Columbia. Although no mention is made of the wooden pillars that the actors run around, they are fascinating. I could find little about them on the Park's website, but I would like to see them someday.

Reviewed by Romana Drew January 16, 2021.















Martoof as a Za'tarc

Jack in the hot seat

Freya/Anise with Sam

Divide and Conquer




Season 4 Episode 5

Directed by Martin Wood Written by Tor Alexander Valenza

Originally aired
Sky One July 28, 2000
Showtime July 28, 2000

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, and Don S. Davis.

With Vanessa Angel as Anise / Freya, JR Bourne as Martouf / Lantash, Kirsten Robek as Lieutenant Astor, Andrew Jackson as Supreme High Councillor Per'sus, Teryl Rothery as Dr. Janet Fraiser.

On Vorash, SG1 and the Tok'ra make plans for a treaty summit between the Tok'ra leaders and the US leaders. Supreme High Councilor Per'sus walks in, and Major Graham attempts to kill him with a Goa'uld weapon. He shoots several people then kills himself. Which is not the best way to negotiate a treaty.

Freya, Anise's host, determines that Graham was a Za'tarc. His mind was programmed by a Goa'uld to kill Per'sus. She brings a Za'tarc detecting device to the SCG and proceeds to test people. Lieutenant Aster tests positive, then attempts to kill everyone in sight before killing herself.

Both Sam and Jack test positive and are confined, but neither are violent or suicidal.

Although Freya is a little less demanding and irritating than Anise, she is no less arrogant. When things go wrong, her apologies seem less than sincere. She comes off as a bit of a cold fish, which makes her feelings toward Jack all the more surprising. And she lacks subtly.

Her costume, however, is anything but subtle - not especially attractive, or comfortable, but the intent is unmistakable.

Divide and Conquer is a poignant and emotionally complex episode. It forces Jack and Sam to acknowledge their feelings for each other. And Sam has to confront her feelings for Martoof, who is also a Za'tarc.

Reviewed by Romana Drew January 19, 2021.















Jack, Malikai at the time loop machine.

Jack and Teal'c taking a day off.

Another way to take a day off.

Window of Opportunity




Season 4 Episode 6

Directed by Peter DeLuise Written by Joseph Mallozzi & Paul Mullie

Originally aired
Sky One August 4, 2000
Showtime August 4, 2000

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, and Don S. Davis.

With Robin Mossley as Malikai, Teryl Rothery as Dr. Janet Fraiser, Dan Shea as Sgt. Siler.

SG1 goes to P4X-639 to study a geomagnetic storm and coronal mass emissions. They meet an archeologist named Malakai. He and Daniel are fascinated by an ancient device. The storm intensifies, and the device activates. Malakai shoots Daniel. A flash of light and Jack is back at breakfast eating Fruit Loops, ten hours earlier.

Now activated, the machine loops time every ten hours. Only Jack and Teal'c remember the previous loops.

To break the loop, they must translate the ancient text on the machine, which means that Jack and Teal'c must convince everyone that they are in a time loop and remember enough to let Daniel make progress on the translation. Which they must then commit to memory.

Of course, this gets tedious. Both Jack and Teal'c take the occasional day off. As Daniel says, "You could do anything without worrying about the consequences."

This is a great, fun episode. Jack makes good use of his days off free of consequences.

It does make one wonder about the Ancients. Although the time device seems to have withstood time without apparent damage, the wall behind it is another story. It seems like the builders of the Stargates would use something other than stone blocks. And have better ways to archive their knowledge than rough carvings on eroding rock.

Also, ten hours isn't quite long enough to convince everyone that the time loop is real and persuade them to work in the necessary directions to solve the problem.

And, when do they sleep? Do they need to sleep or do they reset rested? Someday someone is going to write a time loop story that addresses that.

But none of that makes any difference while watching this episode.

Reviewed by Romana Drew January 22, 2021.















Dr. Svetlana Markov

Teal'c "This does not seem wise!"


Watergate




Season 4 Episode 7

Directed by Martin Wood Written by Robert C. Cooper

Originally aired
Sky One August 11, 2000
Showtime August 11, 2000

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, and Don S. Davis.

With Marina Sirtis as Dr. Svetlana Markov, Tom McBeath as Harry Maybourne, and Gary Jones as Sgt. Walter Harriman.

Holy frozen Maybournes.

Not only do the Russians have a Stargate, but it's stuck open. Until it closes, SG1's Stargate is out of commission. SG1 follows Dr. Svetlana Markov to Siberia to help. When they arrive, all the people are dead except Maybourne. He is in the freezer frozen solid.

Markov, Sam, and Daniel take a mini sub through the Stargate to a world covered in water.

This is one of the more interesting dilemmas of the series. The concept of an ocean of sentient beings, or a sentient ocean is reminiscent of Odo's planet where the Changelings revert to their liquid state and flow together.

Apparently, these beings are small and can infuse themselves into humans if they so desire. They can even protect humans from freezing.

Marina Sirtis does a great job as Dr. Svetlana Markov. She tolerates Jack's skepticism and even gets off a few one liners of her own.

The special effects in the sub, are nice. Daniel innocently sticks his finger into the water. Oops.

Although it isn't covered in this episode, Maybourne is arrested and the Russian program is shut down. But they still have a gate.

This is a great episode.

Reviewed by Romana Drew January 27,2021.















The Unas Marking Daniel

Daniels Fate in a Pictograph

The First Ones




Season 4 Episode 8

Directed by Peter DeLuise Written by Peter DeLuise

Originally aired
Sky One August 18, 2000
Showtime August 18, 2000

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, and Don S. Davis.

With Dion Johnstone as Chaka, Jason Schombing as Dr. Robert Rothman, Vincent Hammond as Unas, and Gary Jones as Sgt. Walter Harriman.

While studying the archeological remains of ancient Goa'uld on P3X-888, Daniel is captured by an Unas, and most of the rest of the researchers are killed. Dr. Robert Rothman makes it back to the gate. Sam, Teal'c, Jack, and a couple of other SG teams come to the rescue.

The Unas ties Daniel's hands and leads him cross country at an exhausting pace. Sam, Jack, and Teal'c follow his trail.

Besides investigating Unas culture and free living Goa'uld, this story also delves into Daniel's character. He does try to escape, but when that fails, Daniel attempts to communicate with his captor, even learning a few words and developing empathy for him.

It is also the end of Rothman. For a unique and often funny character, he comes to a swift and inglorious demise.

Dion Johnstone does a great job as Chaka, the Unas. Even though he is in a huge amount of makeup, prosthetics, and costume, he manages to give Chaka a personality and a range of emotions. Although he is frightening and powerful, he is never a monster, which helps make this a great episode.

Peter DeLuise's writing and directing also deserve credit. This could have been a simple monster movie. Instead it is a sensitive, and exciting episode.

Reviewed by Romana Drew January 30, 2021.















Terraforming

Inside the Ship

Scorched Earth




Season 4 Episode 9

Directed by Martin Wood. Written by Joseph Mallozzi & Paul Mullie

Originally aired
Sky One August 25, 2000
Showtime August 25, 2000

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, and Don S. Davis.

With Brian Markinson as Lotan, Marilyn Norry as Hedrazar, Alessandro Juliani as Eliam, Rob Court as Caleb, and Nikki Smook as Nikka.

After resettling the Enkarans on P5S-381, a giant spaceship comes along, lumbering just above the surface, obliterating everything. The ship is terraforming this world for the Gadmeer, a sulfur-based lifeform.

Even if the SGC can find a suitable planet, there isn't enough time to relocate all the Enkarans before the ship destroys this world. All the remaining Gadmeer are in stasis aboard the ship, and there isn't enough material to start over.

Scorched Earth forces SG1 to either destroy the ship, and with it the Gadmeer, or save a few Enkarans, leaving most to die.

While Jack and Sam go for a military option, Daniel peruses an alternative solution.

When you can't save everyone, how do you choose who lives and who dies? That is the central theme of this story, but the moral dilemma never overwhelms the character development or action. And it never gets preachy.

There are a couple of rough spots. How do people contact the Gadmeer ship? Why does a spaceship designed to terraform an unpopulated world have a way of beaming people aboard and creating a biomechanical being to interface with them?

And, where did the boat come from? SG never brings vehicles through the gate, although why not is never addressed. Why do they have an IRB with, what looks like, a Mercury outboard? Why was it needed? Jack and Sam could have just walked away. Although the Naquadah generator appears rather big and heavy to carry any distance.

At different times, different fads show up in set designs, such as hanging strips of translucent plastic, or as seen here, tubes with bubbles.

Reviewed by Romana Drew February 1, 2021.















Administrator Calder's Office

Daniel and Kegan Downbelow

Beneath the Surface




Season 4 Episode 10

Directed by Peter DeLuise Written by Heather E. Ash

Originally aired
Sky One September 1, 2000
Showtime August 25, 2000

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, and Don S. Davis.

With Alison Matthews as Brenna, Kim Hawthorne as Kegan, Laurie Murdoch as Administrator Calder, Gary Jones as Sgt. Walter Harriman, and Teryl Rothery as Dr. Janet Fraiser.

SG1 is trapped underneath a domed city on an ice age planet. Their memories have been tampered with. They don't know each other anymore and believe this is their normal life. Sam keeps trying to improve things but gets rejected every time. Teal'c gets sick and almost dies.

This episode is about slavery where the slaves don't even know they are abused. Administrator Calder justifies the worker's treatment by saying that they are happy because they don't know any better. They provide a necessary service. And they they are better off where they are because they would never fit into society.

This could be an overly gritty and unpleasant episode, but it avoids most of that and becomes a bit of a mystery. Who are we, and why are we here?

The living conditions of the workers are pretty rough, but they aren't overtly beaten or berated. There is evidence that the sick and injured are cared for. Were these living conditions essential for survival, they might be acceptable. But they are far from necessary and not tolerable.

With SG1 to the rescue, the workers are guaranteed a better future. However, the machinery still needs to be maintained to keep the dome functioning. Will the dome residents take turns working in the basement, or will Administrator Calder simply memory stamp more hapless subjects to become his slaves?

Reviewed by Romana Drew February 2, 2021.















Martin after finding his ship.

Murray on the vibro bed.

Point of No Return




Season 4 Episode 11

Directed by William Gereghty. Written by Joseph Mallozzi and Paul Mullie.

Originally aired
Sky One September 8, 2000
Showtime September 8, 2000

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, and Don S. Davis.

With Willie Garson as Martin Lloyd, Robert Lewis as Dr. Peter Tanner, Matthew Bennett as Ted, Teryl Rothery as Dr. Janet Fraiser, Mar Andersons as Bob, Francis Boyle as Sgt. Peters, ,

Hammond plays a phone message for Jack from Martin Lloyd. Martin sounds like a nut case until he describes the Stargate. Hammond sends Jack to meet Martin and find out what he knows while Daniel and Sam search his house.

Martin claims to be an alien with a spaceship he can't find. He says people are after him. He wants to go through the Stargate to his homeworld. No one takes him seriously until he shows Jack the symbols he saw in his dream - a gate address.

This is a fun episode. Willie Garson (Mozzie in White Collar, Stanford Blatch in Sex in the City and many more) is just perfect as Martin Lloyd. On the surface, he is an easily dismissed kook. But underneath, there is something believable about his story. It makes the viewer want to know more about Martin.

How did the others get Martin to take the drugs in the first place? How did they erase his memories? Also, what happens to them? They just disappear from the story.

The memory-erasing bit is especially interesting as it plays a role in a future episode, Wormhole X-Treme!.

Reviewed by Romana Drew February 8, 2021.















Sam and Daniel on Jacob's ship

Jack in the Death Glider

Tangent




Season 4 Episode 12

Directed by Peter DeLuise Written by Michael Cassutt

Originally aired
Sky One September 15, 2000
Showtime September 15, 2000

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, and Don S. Davis.

With Carmen Argenziano as Jacob /Selmak, and Colin Cunningham as Major Paul Davis.

Teal'c and Jack take the new X-301 Interceptor for a live ammo test. The X-301 is a modified Goa'uld Death Glider. Before they can even target the drone, the ship heads straight out into space. Then Apophis comes over the comm, telling them they are about to die in the cold of space.

After the only possible rescue attempt fails, Jack and Teal'c must accept that they can do nothing except wait until they either suffocate or freeze.

This could be a long and rather boring rehash of Jack's and Teal'c's feelings for each other, their adventures together, their hopes or regrets. But it's Jack and Teal'c. They say a few awkward words and wait for the end.

In the meantime, Sam and Daniel go on a daring rescue.

Even though it is obvious that Jack and Teal'c must get rescued - main characters don't die in the middle of the season - there is still a lot of tension in this episode. There are also a few questions.

In The Devil You Know, the ring transporter only went from an office on Netu to Sokar's palace on Delmak. If memory serves, rings always go from one ring platform to another.

In Tangent, rings are used almost like a transporter. They pluck Jack and Teal'c out of space. Even though Jacob makes a joke about not being Scotty, he does a good impression of beaming people onto his ship.

Also, using a slingshot around Jupiter to get back to Earth sounds fine except, it will take a really long time. It requires precise timing and thrust, which is unlikely to work given that they fired two rockets. Heading back toward Earth doesn't guarantee getting captured by Earth's gravity. It would be extremely lucky if Jupiter and Earth just happened to be in the right positions in space to send the ship toward Earth at an angle and speed where it gets captured by Earth's gravity. And, if they do get back into Earth orbit, how do they get out of the ship?

In researching slingshots around planets, I came across this on Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gravity_assist. The math is beyond me, but the orbital animations are great.

Reviewed by Romana Drew February 10, 2021.















Osiris and Daniel

Jack and Teal'c Fishing

The Curse




Season 4 Episode 13

Directed by Andy Mikita. Written by Joseph Mallozzi & Paul Mullie.

Originally aired
Sky One September 22, 2000
Showtime September 22, 2000

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, and Don S. Davis.

With Anna-Louise Plowman as Dr. Sarah Gardner, Ben Bass as Dr. Steven Rayner, Teryl Rothery as Dr. Janet Fraiser, and David Abbott as Dr. David Jordan.

While Jack and Teal'c go fishing in Minnesota, Daniel goes to the funeral of his old professor. There he meets colleagues, Sarah and Steven. His professor had two canopic jars containing Goa'ulds in stasis. One of the jars is missing.

Steven steals an amulet, which is over 10,000 years old, probably also Goa'uld, and heads for Egypt. Daniel thinks he is now a Goa'uld. He teams up with Sam and Dr. Fraiser and follows Steven to an Egyptian temple

Jack and Teal'c go fishing, which gets them out of the main story. It does make for a couple of great scenes, though.

Look for Sarah Gardner in several future episodes. Her interactions with Daniel are often unpredictable.

The Curse takes a while to get to the end. There are several pieces of information that have to come together, which makes it a bit of a mystery. And the ending unexpected the first time around.

There are a few questions. How did Sarah get to the temple? When Daniel, Sam, and Dr. Fraiser arrive, only Steven's vehicle is at the Temple.

Why did the spaceship sprout a long triangular spike on its underside? It looked interesting but not the least practical either as a form of propulsion or landing. Unless the ship parks by poking a hole in the ground.

With all the interest in Egyptian ruins, how come no one noticed a spaceship just under the surface of the sand. It is lucky that a sand storm didn't uncover it.

Reviewed by Romana Drew February 14, 2021.
















Maybourne and Jack

Sam and the planet killer bomb.

Chain Reaction




Season 4 Episode 15

Directed by Martin Wood. Written by Joseph Mallozzi and Paul Mullie.

Originally aired
Sky One December 13, 2000
Showtime December 13, 2000

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, and Don S. Davis.

With Lawrence Dane as Major General Bauer, Tom McBeath as Harry Maybourne, Gary Jones as Sgt. Walter Harriman, and Ronny Cox as Senator Robert Kinsey.

When SG1 returns under fire, General Hammond announces his retirement. The new CO, General Bauer, disbands SG1. He sends Jack on vacation and orders Sam to make a planet killer bomb. Of course, nothing can go wrong with either of these moves.

Jack discovers that Hammond retired because of threats from the NID, so he goes to Maybourne, now in prison for treason.

Sam and Daniel warn Bauer that detonating that bomb is a really bad idea, but he doesn't listen and it almost destroys Earth.

Even Senator Kensey gets taken down a notch, although it doesn't hurt his political career.

Maybourne is always a great character. Not exactly a villain, but slimy and willing to get his hands dirty. First, he commits treason for the NID. Then he sells them out. Never fear, we haven't heard the last of Maybourne. He may be part Cheshire Cat, disappearing and reappearing whenever needed.

This is a good solid episode with lots of character development.

Reviewed by Romana Drew February 15, 2021.















Daniel, Sam and Teal'c getting an award for introducing the world to the Aschen.

SGC tour guide.

2010




Season 4 Episode 16

Directed by Andy Mikita. Written by Brad Wright.

Originally aired
Sky One January 3, 2001
Showtime January 3, 2001

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, and Don S. Davis.

With Christopher Cousins as Ambassador Joseph Faxon, Dion Luther as Mollem, Gary Jones as Sgt. Walter Harriman, Ronny Cox as President Robert Kinsey, Teryl Rothery as Dr. Janet Fraiser, and Linnea Johnson as SGC Tour Guide.

It is nine years in the future, and Earth is at peace. The Aschen have defeated the Goa'uld and given Earth an amazing amount to technology. Although Hammond is dead and Jack has dropped out, Sam, Teal'c and Daniel are doing great.

In trying to figure out why Sam, now happily married, isn't pregnant, she and Dr. Fraiser discover the Aschen's deep, dark secret. Without anybody noticing, they sterilized almost all the women on Earth. Even if the Aschen could be forced off the planet, humans are doomed. The only way to solve the problem is to prevent it from happening in the first place.

There is a way to send a message back in time to warn themselves, if they can pinpoint a solar flare, if they can get a working GDO, and if they can get through the gate before the Aschen kill them all.

I don't see how a solar flare can send the wormhole back in time, or, assuming it does, how they can control how far it goes. If the wormhole went back thirty years, the stargate would activate while being secretly studied. Going back further, the gate may be buried, or be used by a Gou'ald. But it makes for a good story with lots of problems to solve.

One of the best lines comes during lunch. After, Daniel, Sam, Teal'c and Doctor Frazier realize that the Aschen have quietly condemned mankind, the waitress comes by and asks, "Will there be anything else?" Daniel answers, "Apparently, not."

Linnea Johnson does a marvolus job as the SGC tour guide. I've never met a tour guide quite so over the top, but then I don't go on many tours.

This episode builds nicely to an exciting conclusion. But wait, the Aschen return in a future episode.

Reviewed by Romana Drew March 1, 2021.















The hyponotic lights

Daniel about to jump.

The Light




Season 4 Episode 18

Directed by Peter F. Woeste. Written by James Phillips.

Originally aired
Sky One January 26, 2001
Showtime January 26, 2001

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, and Don S. Davis.

With Kristian Ayre as Loran, Gary Jones as Sgt. Walter Harriman, and Teryl Rothery as Dr. Janet Fraiser.

Sam and Lieutenant Barber wait P4XC-347 is dialed up. Chevron 7 locks. Barber runs into the forming vortex and is vaporized. Hammond recalls SG5 and Daniel Jackson from P4XC-347. Soon, everyone who visited P4XC-347 becomes depressed, suicidal, and eventually comatose.

Jack, Teal'c, and Sam review videos from the planet and see another person hiding. They go to the planet to rescue the mystery person. There they find a complex console with hypnotic, cascading waves of light, and a teenage boy.

They also discover that they cannot travel far from the console without suffering fatal withdrawal symptoms. Which means they can never leave the planet. Although they would be living in a kind of palace, it doesn't look like a place to spend the rest of your life.

Daniel hasn't died for a while, but he comes very close in this episode. Sam is seldom the 'damsel in distress', but Daniel often is.

This is another story that leaves out a rather important piece of information. What did the boy eat? His parents have been dead for a long time, and he is alone. Where does his food come from?

The special effects on the console are great. Light falls in waves that cascade over complex shapes and illuminate the characters in a rainbow of colors. It looks as if the light has some substance. I tried to find out how the special effects were done, but I didn't succeed.

Reviewed by Romana Drew March 5, 2021















The Entity Controlling Sam

The Entity's Lair

Entity




Season 4 Episode 20

Directed by Allan Lee. Written by Peter DeLuise.

Originally aired
Sky One February 9, 2001
Showtime February 9, 2001

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, and Don S. Davis.

With Gary Jones as Sgt. Walter Harriman, Teryl Rothery as Dr. Janet Fraiser, and Dan Shea as Sgt. Siler.

After sending a MALP to P9C-372, it sends back pictures of unique architecture and then appears to fly across the landscape. The computer systems go haywire, sparking and exploding. Then the security cameras move on their own and display pictures of the people in the room.

Something has invaded the computer system. But it doesn't stop there. It invades Sam!

Turns out the alien entity has a good reason for attacking, but No one is willing to let it have its way and destroy the Earth. But there may not be any way of stopping it short of killing Sam.

This episode is Sam's turn to die. Of course, she doesn't stay dead.

The big question about this episode is how the entity built the massive mess of wires and things in the MALP room. Yes, it could control the MALPS, but they don't appear to have the ability to do any detailed work, like dissembling computers and repurposing their parts. And, of course, where did all the wires and things come from. All that stuff couldn't have been inside a couple of MALPs.

Reviewed by Romana Drew March 5, 2021.















Jack and Jack

Teal'c taking his revenge on Cronus

Double Jeopardy




Season 4 Episode 21

Directed by Michael Shanks. Written by Robert C. Cooper.

Originally aired
Sky One February 16, 2001
Showtime February 16, 2001

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, and Don S. Davis.

With Belinda Waymouth as Ja'din, Jay Brazeau as Harlan, Ron Halder as Cronus, Matthew Harrison as Darian, and Bill Croft as Sindar.

SG1 gates to Juna, where they had previously defeated Heru'ur and told the people to bury their Stargate to prevent the Goa'uld from returning. However, Chronus is now in charge, there is a ship in orbit, and SG1 doesn't remember ever having been to Juna.

There are some subtle clues, Jack's hair is not gray. Both Sam and Daniel have longer hair. It isn't until Harlan shows up that things begin to make sense.

SG1, the human versions must rescue their mechanical duplicates before Cronus kills them and punishes the people of Juna.

When they dial Juna and the Stargate opens Sam says it must be active, implying that a buried Stargate would not open. But in A Hundred Days from season 3, they open the buried Stargate, creating a pocket in the rock, so Teal'c can go through and rescue Jack.

As the penultimate episode of this season, Double Jeopardy ties up a loose end. The duplicates are out and about gating around and going on missions. Eventually, they had to meet their human counterparts.

I would like to have had this end differently, but it does put an end to the Tin Man story from season 1.

There are the usual twin special effects where the two characters are on the screen simultaneously but don't overlap. However, in one scene, Jack gets his counterpart in a headlock with both Jacks facing the camera. It doesn't last long. But it really looks like there are two Jack O'Neills.

Ddirected by Michael Shanks, the episonde has good pacing and a well told story with lots of excitement.

Reviewed by Romana Drew March 6, 2021.















Jacob and Sam at the Pel'tak

Exploding the Vorash's sun

Exodus


Season 4 Episode 22

Directed by David Warry-Smith. Written by Joseph Mallozzi & Paul Mullie.

Originally aired
Sky One February 23, 2001
Showtime February 23, 2001

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, and Don S. Davis.

With Carmen Argenziano as Jacob Carter / Selmak, Peter Wingfield as Tanith, and Peter Williams as Apophis.

After defeating Cronos, SG1 commandeers his Ha'tak and travels to Vorash, the Tok'ra stronghold. To keep this information from Apophis, Tanith must go. Although he is a Goa'uld spy, the Tok'ra have let him live among them, using him to feed Apophis misinformation.

Of course, it isn't that easy. The Tok'ra must evacuate to the Ha'tak and get free before Apophis' fleet arrives. But Teal'c goes back to the planet to take revenge on Tanith for his father's death, and then Jack follows him.

Of the many ways to take out an entire fleet of space ships, blowing up a sun seems like overkill. But it does make for a ticking timebomb story. Once the gate is launched, there isn't any way to stop the catastrophe - escape or die. But, of course, it doesn't end there.

Teal'c has been captured, and SG1 is stranded one-hundred twenty-five years from home with only Apophis for company. This exciting, action-packed story keeps a good pace throughout - a great way to end the season.

Fortunately, I can watch the next episode tomorrow. When it first aired, everyone had to wait over four months to find out what happens next.

Reviewed by Romana Drew March 15, 2021




Friends and Enemies
Season 5










Teal'c in the service of Apophis

Apophis and the Replicators

Enemies




Season 5 Episode 1

Directed by Martin Wood

Story by Brad Wright, Robert C. Cooper, Joseph Mallozzi and Paul Mullie. Teleplay by Robert C. Cooper.

Originally aired
Sky One June 29, 2001
Showtime June 29, 2001

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, and Don S. Davis.

With Carmen Argenziano as Jacob Carter / Selmak, Peter Williams as Apophis, Jennifer Calvert as Ren'al, Gary Jones as Sgt. Walter Harriman, Thomas Milburn Jr. as Jaffa #1, Dean Moen as Jaffa #2,

Apophis, safe in his mothership, takes aim at the Ha'tak carrying SG1 and Jacob. He misses. Another ship zooms by firing on Apophis, so Jacob and Sg1 run and hide.

Eventually, they creep back to find Apophis' ship adrift and the other ship gone. Pleased with their good fortune, they board the mothership. It's crawling with replicators, and the self-destruct is counting down.

Apophis has come back from so many catastrophes that it is a bit hard to believe that he is really gone. It is also a little odd that Teal'c escaped and Apophis didn't. But Teal'c is needed for the next episode. So is Apophis, but that will have to wait until the next episode.

This is another exciting, action packed storty and a great way to start the new season. But it isn't over. Apophis can't leave the Stargate universe with out messing up a few things on the way.

Reviewed by Romana Drew March 16, 2021.










Teal'c in training

Teal'c in treatment

Threshold




Season 5 Episode 2

Directed by Peter DeLuise. Written by Brad. Wright.

Originally aired
Sky One July 6, 2001
Showtime July 6, 2001

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, and Don S. Davis.

With Tony Amendola as Master Bra'tac, Brook Susan Parker as Drey'auc, Peter. Williams as Apophis, David Lovgren as Va'lar, Teryl Rothery as Dr. Janet Fraiser.

Back at the SGC, counseling fails. Teal'c is brainwashed to believe that Apophis is a god, and the Tau'ri are his enemies. Bra'tac pulls Teal'c's symbiont out and leaves him to die, tied up on a bed. If it works, he will remember why he opposed Apophis in the first place.

Various people talk with Teal'c as he relives much of his early life.

This episode gives insight into Teal'c's life before leaving Apophis and freeing SG1. It also develops his relationship with Bra'tac. However, it's a bit tedious. These events have already happened. We already know life isn't pleasant for a Jaffa. Since Apophis is good and dead, this is now ancient history. The scenes are dark bluish-gray giving them an even more depressing feel.

This episode is worth watching once to learn the depth of Goa'uld brainwashing and to learn more about Jaffa society. If it is skipped, Teal'c's recovery isn't explained, which may not be that much of a problem.

Reviewed by Romana Drew March 19, 2021










Sam and Orlin

Orlin and the device

Ascension




Season 5 Episode 3

Directed by Martin. Wood. Written by Robert C. Cooper.

Originally aired
Sky One July 13, 2001
Showtime July 13, 2001

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, and Don S. Davis.

With Sean Patrick Flanery as Orlin, John de Lancie as Colonel Frank Simmons, Teryl Rothery as Dr. Janet Fraiser, Ben. Wilkinson as O'Brien, Eric Breker as Colonel Reynolds, Rob Fournier as Special Forces Commander,

On Velona, Sam is attacked and rendered unconscious while investigating an alien device. She thinks the device is a powerful weapon, but the power supply is missing. However, it can be powered with a Naquadah generator. Unable to explain why Sam passed out, Dr. Fraiser orders her to take some time off.

At home, Sam meets Orlin. He seems like a normal man until he walks through her kitchen counter. She reports Orlin, but he disappears only to return after all the surveillance cameras are removed. Well, not quite all the cameras.

Colonel Frank Simmons aggressively interrogates everyone, finding fault with their work performance and questioning their loyalties. He demands that the weapon be test-fired, which is a really bad idea.

Although this is not an action-packed episode, it is a good one. The pacing is excellent.

John de Lancie is slimy and obnoxious as Simmons, just perfect for that role. His questioning gets a little tedious, but it doesn't last too long.

It takes a while to figure out who or what Orlin is. He gives us a second look at ascended beings and a lead into the end of the season.

Reviewed by Romana Drew, March 23, 2021.










Lieutenant Tyler

Also Lieutenant Tyler

The Fifth Man




Season 5 Episode 4

Directed by Peter DeLuise. Written by Joseph Mallozzi & Paul Mullie

Originally aired
Sky One July 20, 2001
Showtime July 20, 2001

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, and Don S. Davis.

With Dion Johnstone as Lt. Tyler, Gary Jones as Sgt. Walter Harriman, John de Lancie as Colonel Frank Simmons, and Teryl Rothery as Dr. Janet Fraiser.

On P7S-441, Jack stays to help Lieutenant Tyler while Sam, Daniel, and Teal'c return to the SGC for reinforcements. No one at the SGC has heard of Tyler, and there isn't any record of him. So Hammond prohibits anyone from going to P7S-441.

Jaffa keep Jack and Tyler pinned down.

Simmons returns to question everyone again.

This is an intense episode. Jack desperately tries to keep Tyler alive, but the odds are against both of them. Hammond refuses to send help, believing that Sam, Daniel, and Teal'c are compromised. And, to make a bad situation worse, Simmons sticks his nose into the mess.

There is obviously something different about Tylor, how different isn't revealed until just before the end.

Most of this story moves along just fine. But I do wonder how they took out so many Jaffa, so easily at the end. And, of course, why the Jaffa were attacking them in the first place.

Reviewed by Romana Drew April 1, 2021.










Cassandra and Her Mother

Nirrti

Rite of Passage




Season 5 Episode 6

Directed by Peter DeLuise. Written by Heather E. Ash

Originally aired
Sky One August 3, 2001
Showtime August 3, 2001

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, and Don S. Davis.

With Colleen Rennison as Cassandra, Jacqueline Samuda as Nirrti, Teryl Rothery as Dr. Janet Fraiser.

It's Cassandra's sixteenth birthday, but she doesn't want anything to do with Sam or Janet's plans. She has a boyfriend. He kisses her, and the porch light explodes. She faints. Back at the SGC infirmary, she uses her mind to twirl a chess piece in the middle of the air and demands she be taken into the woods.

Her fever spikes dangerously high. So SG1 returns to Hanka, Cassandra's homeworld, to see if anything in the forest can help her. They find Nirrti, the Goa'uld who killed everyone on Hanka.

Colleen Rennison does a great job as an uncooperative teen.

This is a bit of a mystery. Each member tries to unravel Nirrti's actions and her intentions. Then they have to deal with Nirrti herself, never an easy task.

Reviewed by Romana Drew April 3, 2021.











Chaka

Burrock

Beast of Burden




Season 5 Episode 7

Directed by Martin. Wood. Written by Peter DeLuise

Originally aired
Sky One August 10, 2001
Showtime August 10, 2001

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, and Don S. Davis.

With Larry Drake as Burrock, Dion Johnstone as Chaka, Alex Zahara as Shy One, Vincent Hammond as Big One, Noel Callahan as the boy.

On P3X-888, Daniel has baited camera traps that he uses to study the wild Unas. One is near the DHD. So when someone kidnaps Chaka, the camera records the gate address. And SG1 goes to the rescue.

They find a world where the Unas are slaves. Centuries of inbreeding have caused problems within the Unas population. Burrock, a slave trader, has kidnapped Chaka to increase the genetic diversity in his stock. Chaka has other ideas.

What starts as a simple rescue operation becomes much more complicated. The Unas originally enslaved the humans with the help of the Goa'uld. Then the humans defeated and enslaved the Unas.

Although slavery is abhorrent to SG1, it is unlikely that they can change this society. Do they have the right to try? Would freeing the Unas start a war, bringing death and destruction to both sides? Can the two species ever live in peace?

In the end, the decision is taken out of their hands.

Reviewed by Romana Drew April 7, 2021.











Entrance to the Ziggurat

The Creature

The Tomb




Season 5 Episode 8

Directed by Peter DeLuise. Written by Joseph Mallozzi & Paul Mullie

Originally aired
Sky One August 17, 2001
Showtime August 17, 2001

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, and Don S. Davis.

With Earl Pastko as Colonel Zukhov, Alexander Kalugin as Major Vallarin, Jen Halley as Lieutenant Tolinev, Vitaly Kravchenko as Lt. Marchenko, and Garry Chalk as Colonel Chekov.

The Russians are missing. Even though the Russian Stargate program only lasted a month and has been shut down for several months, a group was left stranded on P2X-338. They went in search of the Eye of Tiamat.

Hammond agrees to let a Russian team join SG1 in a rescue attempt. After Daniel opens an ancient ziggurat, things start to go south.

The Russians are inside, all dead, all eaten. There is a creature, of course, a sarcophagus and a Goa'uld. Zukhov even finds the Eye of Tiamat, though it doesn't help.

The interaction between Jack and Colonel Zukhov, the Russian team leader, is great. Jack wants to establish himself as leader, but Zukhov simply doesn't listen. Although, he should have.

This is a visually dark episode. It takes place are inside a ziggurat with only flashlights. Sand and rooks keep falling. But the action is good, and the characters are complex and interesting.

When the creature first appears, it looks like a crab emerging from a mat of webbing. The front legs appear to have a black exoskeleton and are articulated. But when it is killed, it looks somewhat reddish and squid-like, soft and boneless. Was there a specia effects snafu, or was the viewer not supposed to notice?

Reviewed by Romana Drew April 11, 2021.










Sam and Narim

Tanith and Chancellor Travell

Between Two Fires




Season 5 Episode 9

Directed by. William Gereghty. Written by Ron. Wilkerson

Originally aired
Sky One August 24, 2001
Showtime August 24, 2001

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, and Don S. Davis.

With Garwin Sanford as Narim, Marie Stillin as High Chancellor Travell, Peter. Wingfield as Tanith, and Gary Jones as Sgt. Walter Harriman.

Omac has died. At his funeral, Chancellor Travell offers ion cannons to Earth in exchange for trinium. That sounds like great news, but there has to be a catch. Why share such dangerous and advanced technology now? Why do they need trinium from the humans? Can't they find their own?

In Enigma from season 1, Omac tells Sam that he and his team were to be the last to leave Tollan before raging volcanos destroyed it. And that SG1 rescued then before the transport ship arrived. Omac describes the new Tollan homeworld as outside the gate system.

In season 3, Pretense takes place on Tollan where Klorel is removed from Skaara. The Stargate is functional and the planet geologically stable.

Apparently, the Tollans changed their mind about having a Stargate.

Nothing quite makes sense until Tanith shows up. But it isn't all his doing. He serves a much more powerful Goa'uld.

Chancellor Travell's costume is reminiscent of early Star Trek women's costumes. The thing around her neck has got to be uncomfortable. It looks more like a brace or restraint collar than a fashion accessory. And her hair looks plastic.

This episode has lots of running around, walking through walls, and other moderate action leading to an exciting conclusion. It turns out that the Tollan are in over their heads.

Reviewed by Romana Drew April 14, 2021.










Escape from the Aschen

Inside the Aschen harvester

2001




Season 5 Episode 10

Directed by Peter DeLuise. Written by Brad. Wright.

Originally aired
Sky One August 31, 2001
Showtime August 24, 2001

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, and Don S. Davis.

With Christopher Cousins as Ambassador Joseph Faxon, Dion Luther as Mollem, Robert Moloney as Borren, Gary Jones as Sgt. Walter Harriman, and Ronny Cox as Senator Robert Kinsey.

Volia is an agrarian planet. Volians are simple farmers. The Aschen help them farm and harvest all the unneeded crops as payment. On the surface, this looks like an ideal partnership. The Aschen even offer to help Earth overcome disease and pollution, all for the price of a few gate addresses.

If something sounds too good to be true, it probably is. So Daniel and Teal'c look under the surface where they find that the Aschen have been less than honest about the relationship they want to build with Earth.

This isn't the first time SG1 has encountered the Aschen. But it is nice to see what Earth would have become had not Jack, Sam, Teal'c, and Daniel been willing to sacrifice their lives to save their world. Of course, they don't remember that alternate timeline, but viewers do.

Even though we have seen the Aschen before and know their game plan, this episode is well worth watching. It has a good story, good pacing, and interesting characters. The Aschen don't give up easily, and they have more than one way to remove all the undesirable locals from a world.

Reviewed by Romana Drew April, 2, 2021.










Sam Attempting to Escape

Adrian Conrad

Desperate Measures




Season 5 Episode 11

Directed by William Gereghty. Written by Joseph Mallozzi and Paul Mullie.

Originally aired
Sky One September 7, 2001
Showtime September 7, 2001

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, and Don S. Davis.

With John de Lancie as Colonel Frank Simmons, Tom McBeath as Harry Maybourne, Bill Marchant as Adrian Conrad, and Teryl Rothery as Dr. Janet Fraiser.

Sam gets kidnapped by ninjas. Jack suspects NID and contacts Maybourne. He denies involvement but tells Jack to contact user 4574, otherwise known as Colonel Frank Simmons.

Adrian Conrad of Zeditron Industries kidnaps Sam to figure out how to get a Goa'uld out of him. He intends to implant one to cure his illness. Then he thinks he can take it out. This can't go well.

This story has lots of twists and turns as Conrad, Simmons, and even Maybourne take advantage of the changing situations.

Granted, someone facing imminent death would be willing or even anxious to try experimental treatments, but becoming a Goa'uld? Conrad did enough research to procure a symbiont, and he knowns the consequences of joining. He clearly doesn't want to become Goa'uld, only to get well. Why didn't he buy a sarcophagus? That would be a lot safer.

Adrian Conrad is a wealthy, powerful ass, a megalomaniac with delusions of godhood. But he is useful in future episodes.

Simmons is not an honest and upstanding character. In this episode, he goes irretrievably over to the darkside. But he doesn't go away - yet.

Desperate Measures is a good episode with lots of action and lots of problems to solve.

Reviewed by Romana Drew April 24, 2021.










The Logo

The Cast

Wormhole X-Treme!




Season 5 Episode 12

Directed by Peter DeLuise. Story by Brad Wright, Joseph Mallozzi and Paul Mull. Teleplay by Joseph Mallozzi and Paul Mullie. Originally aired
Sky One September 14, 2001
Showtime September 14, 2001

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, and Don S. Davis.

With Willie Garson as Martin Lloyd, Michael DeLuise as Nick Marlowe / Colonel Danning, Jill Teed as Yolanda Reese / Stacy Monroe, Christian Bocher as Raymond Gunne / Dr. Levant, Robert Lewis as Dr. Peter Tanner, Teryl Rothery as Dr. Janet Fraiser, and Peter DeLuise as Director



Martin Lloyd is back. This time he's a consultant on the TV show Wormhole X-Treme!, a takeoff on the Stargate Program. His associates are still on Earth awaiting the return of their spaceship. Lloyd is back on the memory-altering meds and doesn't remember he's an alien.

All this is interesting but doesn't make much of a story, except Martin has a device that his associates need to enter their fast-approaching spaceship. And the NID wants to get their hands on anything they can, especially the ship.

Willie Garson is charming as the clueless Martin Lloyd.

Michael DeLuise does an over-the-top version of the Jack O'Neill character, but in this situation, it works. So do the rest of the SG1 clones. And, Michael's brother, Peter DeLuise, who directed this episode, plays the director of Wormhole X-Treme!. Since the episode is well directed, I assume Peter is a much better director than the fictional director.

This is a fun episode with good comedy and a great ending.

Reviewed by Romana Drew April 26, 2021.










Defusing a bomb, or not.

Let the simulation begin.

Proving Ground




Season 5 Episode 13

Directed by Andy Mikita. Written by Ron. Wilkerson

Originally aired
Sky One November 28, 2001
Showtime March 8, 2002

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, and Don S. Davis.

With Courtenay J. Stevens as Lieutenant Elliot, Elisabeth Rosen as Air Force Lt. Jennifer Hailey, Grace Park as Lt. Satterfield, David Kopp as Lieutenant Grogan, Michael Kopsa as General Kerrigan.

SG1 takes four new recruits on a couple of training missions. There are lots of explosions and excitement. Using zats and In'tars, they shoot everyone even Sam, Daniel, and Jack. After the last scenario, several vehicles drive up, and people get out. Jack kills them all and then orders the recruits to assist. There is a foothold situation at the SGC.

Daniel Jackson appears to be the leader of the insurrection. Most of the people at the SGC are under the influence of a Goa'uld mind control device. Although told to set their In'tars on maximum force, they are also issued 'live' ammo. And the crusade to free the SGC is on.

The recruits run through rooms, shooting people and setting bombs. The gate is stuck open and pouring radiation into the building.

There are a few hints that all is not what it seems. They start out rather subtle but get more apparent as the show progresses.

This is an excellent, exciting story, with an 'everybody lives' ending.

Pay attention to Elliot. You'll be seeing him again soon.

Reviewed by Romana Drew April 28, 2021.










Sam and Rodney

Teal'c

48 Hours






Season 5 Episode 14

Directed by Peter F. Woeste. Written by Robert C. Cooper.

Originally aired
Sky One December 5, 2001
Showtime March 15, 2002

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, and Don S. Davis.

With David Hewlett as Dr. Rodney McKay, Tom McBeath as Harry Maybourne, Colin Cunningham as Major Paul Davis, Bill Marchant as Adrian Conrad / Goa'uld, Garry Chalk as Colonel Chekov, Gary Jones as Sgt. Walter Harriman, John de Lancie as Colonel Frank Simmons, and Dan Shea as Sgt. Siler.

Jack, Sam, Daniel, and Teal'c run for the gate. Tanith is after them with Death Gliders and Al'keshs. Teal'c turns, takes aim, and blows Tanith to bits before diving through the gate. Unfortunately, Tanith's ship hits the Stargate and explodes before Teal'c reintegrates at the SGC.

Teal'c might be stuck in the Stargate's buffer. If so, activating the gate will kill him. They must do something before anyone tries to gate in. Using lightspeed diplomacy, they get the Russians to help. Their gate has a DHD.

The Russians agree to bring all the off world teams home. But that still leaves Teal'c stuck in the buffer of the SGC gate. Of course, Simmon sticks his nose into the mess, giving Hammond just 48 hours to retrieve Teal'c. After that, he is ordered to resume normal gate activity. Simmons even brings his own expert, Rodney McKay.

That still doesn't solve the problem of retrieving Teal'c, so Jack recruits Maybourne to find and extract the necessary information from Adrian Conrad, Simmons resident, although caged, Goa'uld.

Watching this show makes me wonder what the producers and writers saw in the Rodney McKay character. In this episode, he is rude, clueless, obnoxious, sexist, and egotistical. Sending him to Russia just felt so right. Of course, Rodney returns many times and is a main character in Stargate Atlantis. Fortunately, his character is softened in later episodes.

And Simmons gets his comeuppance.

Good episode.

Reviewed by Romana Drew April 28, 2021










Ba'al, Daniel, and Yu.

Osiris

Summit




Season 5 Episode 15

Directed by Martin. Wood. Written by Joseph Mallozzi and Paul Mullie

Originally aired
Sky One December 19, 2001
Showtime March 22, 2002

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, and Don S. Davis.

With Carmen Argenziano as Jacob Carter / Selmak, Anna-Louise Plowman as Dr. Sarah Gardner / Osiris, Cliff Simon as Ba'al, Courtenay J. Stevens as Lieutenant Elliot, Gary Jones as Sgt. Walter Harriman, Anthony Ulc as Mansfield, and Vince Crestejo as Yu-huang Shang Ti.

Jacob recruits Daniel to spy on a meeting of Goa'uld System Lords aboard a spaceship. He is disguised as Lord Yu's Lo'tar or personal servant. When all the System Lords are aboard, Daniel is supposed to release a Tok'ra poison that will kill the symbionts.

Zipacna recruits Osiris to attend the meeting as Anubis' representative. Since Osiris' host is Sara Gardner, Daniel's old girlfriend, what could possibly go wrong.

In the meantime, Zipacna sends a fleet of ships to attack the Tok'ra base on Revanna. Sam, Teal'c, Jack, and Lieutenant Elliot are trapped in Tok'ra tunnels. Most people have been killed, and the gate is heavily guarded.

The costuming in this episode is fantastic. Each of the System Lords and their slaves are wonderfully attired. Their costumes are often reminscent of the ancient gods or mythical characters attached to their names.

To be continued.

There's a lot going on in this exciting and complex story. Pay attention to both Yu and Baal. They make appearances in future episodes.

Reviewed by Romana Drew April 30, 2021










Daniel, how dare you escape escape!

Dinnertime. Let's feast on our offspring.

Various System Lords

Last Stand




Season 5 Episode 16

Directed by Martin. Wood. Written by Robert C. Cooper

Originally aired
Sky One January 9, 2002
Showtime March 29, 2002

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, and Don S. Davis.

With Carmen Argenziano as Jacob Carter / Selmak, Anna-Louise Plowman as Dr. Sarah Gardner / Osiris, Cliff Simon as Ba'al, Courtenay J. Stevens as Lieutenant Elliot / Lantash, Vince Crestejo as Yu-huang Shang Ti, Kevin Durand as Zipacna, Kwesi Ameyaw as Olokun, Suleka Mathew as Kali, Paul Anthony as Slave, Andrew Kavadas as Zipacna's Jaffa, and Natasha Jean as Bastet.

Continued from Summit.

Daniel is trapped on a Goa'uld spaceship full of System Lords. Osiris has just recognized him and come to find out why he is here.

Apparently, Anubis was so powerful and evil that the System Lords killed him. If he is now alive and free, killing the System Lords isn't such a good idea.

Sam, Teal'c, and Jack are trapped in collapsing Tok'ra tunnels with critically injured Lieutenant Elliot. When a section fell, it broke the container holding Lantash, Martoof's symbiont. In hopes of saving two lives, Lantash joined with Elliot.

Daniel must escape the System Lords. Jack, Sam, and Teal'c must reach the heavily guarded Stargate carrying a seriously injured person.

This episode is exciting. It has lots of action and many interesting characters, but upon closer examination, not much happens. Anubis is still a threat, and the system lords are still alive. Many Tok'ra are dead, as are mature symbionts.

The names of the System Lords are familiar.
* Ba'al is the god of storm, fertility, and other things in several belief systems.
* Yu-huang Shang Ti was the ruler of the Chinese gods around 2000 BC.
* Zipacna is an arrogant and violent Myan god who boasted of creating mountains.
* Olokun is the ruler of waters and owner of the sea in some African cultures.
* Kali is a Hindu god, the destroyer of evil.
* Bastet is an Egyptian goddess of protection, pleasure, and good health
- Morrigan is a Celtic goddess of war, witchcraft, death, protection, and retribution.
* Osiris is the Egyptian god of fertility, agriculture, the afterlife, the dead, resurrection, life, and vegetation.

Summit and Last Stand are fun episodes to watch, well-acted and directed, with lots of action, a good amount of humor, even good character development. But the ending doesn't quite work.

Fading out on the picture of the dying Elliot/Lantash isn't quite as powerful as it should be, at least for me. I would like that scene to dissolve into the army at the gate collapsing, showing that their sacrifice was successful. Bringing home the fact that they too died at that moment.

Reviewed by Romana Drew April 17 2021.










Jack Teal'c and a bomb.

Daniel in his most helpful pose.

Fail Safe




Season 5 Episode 17

Directed by Andy Mikita. Written by Joseph Mallozzi & Paul Mullie

Originally aired
Sky One December 12, 2001
Showtime April 5, 2002

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, and Don S. Davis.

With Colin Cunningham as Major Paul Davis, Gary Jones as Sgt. Walter Harriman, Teryl Rothery as Dr. Janet Fraiser, David Bloom as Spellman, Greg Anderson as Webber, Michael Teigen as Telescope Guy, and Kirsten Alter as Jalen.

An asteroid is about to collide with Earth, destroying all life. The Tok'ra can't help, and the Asgard won't. The Protected Planet Treaty doesn't say anything about natural disasters.

SG1 retrieves and repairs the Tel'tak Jacob and Daniel crashed on Revanna. They load up a naquadah enhanced nuclear warhead and head for the asteroid, only to crash.

Although there aren't any battles or exciting action scenes, this episode has plenty of suspense and tension. The special effects, Jack and Teal'c walking on the surface of the asteroid, are nice. I get moving the bomb a few feet away from the ship so takeoff doesn't cause it to explode, but why move it such a long distance. It's a nauqadah enhanced nuclear bomb, what difference does fifty yeards make?

Landing on an asteroid, deploying a bomb, and getting off before it blows up would be rather difficult. But that is way too simple to fill up an hour. Many things go wrong, including realizing that the asteroid itself is made of naquadah. Blowing it up will take out the Earth. And the Tel'tak can't lift off the surface.

SG1 Appears doomed.

Reviewed by Romana Drew May 20 2021.










Reese and one of her friends.

Hammond taking things into his own hands.

Menace




Season 5 Episode 19

Directed by Martin. Wood. Story by James Tichenor. Teleplay by Peter DeLuise.

Originally aired
Sky One April 26, 2002
Showtime April 26, 2002

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, and Don S. Davis.

With Danielle Nicolet as Reese, Gary Jones as Sgt. Walter Harriman, Teryl Rothery as Dr. Janet Fraiser, Colin Lawrence as SG-3 Leader, and Dan Shea as Sgt. Siler.

SG1 explores a deserted planet. At one time, it must have as a thriving technological society, but everyone is gone. They do find one young woman, sleeping, and a few replicator bits.

The young woman, Reese, is an android. Her power supply is drained. Sam powers her up, and she wakes up believing she is human.

Worrying about her feelings, they try to find a way to explain that she is a machine. This all seems straightforward until she throws Daniel across the room and makes a Replicator out of everyday objects. She calls them her toys, and she told them to make more of themselves, destroying her world, and unleashing a plague oof replicators on the galaxy.

This is a good episode. It takes a while for Reese's story to come out and to understand who she is, what she did, and her inability to accept the conquests of her actions.

Danielle Nicolet does a great job of playing a spoiled, selfish teenager. You can almost empathize with the character, at least in the beginning. Nicolet makes Reese's denial, guilt, fear, and immaturity feel very real.

Reviewed by Romana Drew May 22, 2021.










Marul

The Sentinel

The Sentinel




Season 5 Episode 20

Directed by Peter DeLuise. Written by Ron Wilkerson

Originally aired
Sky One May 3, 2002
Showtime May 3, 2002

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, and Don S. Davis.

With Henry Gibson as Marul, Frank Cassini as Colonel Sean Grieves, Christina Cox as Lieutenant Kershaw, David Kopp as Lieutenant Grogan, Gary Jones as Sgt. Walter Harriman, Colin Lawrence as Major Lawrence, Shawn Reis as Jaffa Commander, Carrie Anne Fleming as Assistant, and Chris Newton as Caretaker.

System Lord Svarog is intent on claiming Latona. For centuries the Sentinel has protected Latona from the Goa'uld, but ever since NID investigated the device, it has failed to work.

Colonel Sean Grieves and Lieutenant Kershaw are released from prison, where they are on death row for treason. Since they broke the Sentinel, they are tasked with fixing it, exchanging executions for life in prison.

Savrog is a typical Ga'uld System Lord, arrogant and demanding. His Jaffa are not much different.

Henry Gibson, as Marul, the Latonan leader, is a joy to watch. He plays off the Jaffa and SG1, refusing to be intimidated while continuing to be mild-mannered and just a bit clueless.

Grieves and Kershaw honestly believed in the NID and their mission. Although they took the device apart, they believed they reassembled it correctly and did not intend to harm the Latonans.

This episode has several battles and lots of excitement. But I do have a couple of comments. Why is the Sentinel located in the middle of a huge slash (logging debris) pile? As camouflage goes, that isn't very effective, nor is it safe. Those piles usually get burned when the weather is right.

When trying to disable the force field, Daniel says he is listening for, "The mathematical progression of the harmonic in each given pattern relative to its spectral equivalent."

That is an interesting phrase, a bit of technobabble for sure, but still interesting. A mathematical progression of a harmonic is something that mathematicians calculate. The usefulness and reasons for doing so elude me. Music also has harmonic progressions, usually referring to cord sequences. Since the device is producing sound, this may be what he is referring to.

Spectral equivalent probably refers to the wavelength of the colors on the machine.

Since sounds also have wavelengths, this may mean that the changes in the wavelength of the sounds must be relative to wavelengths of the changing colors on the device. Nice idea. It reminds me of devices that flash different colors for different frequencies in music.

Reviewed by Romana Drew May 23, 2021.










Daniel and Jack

Jack, Oma, and Daniel

Meridian




Season 5 Episode 21

Directed by. William. Waring. Written by Robert C. Cooper

Originally aired
Sky One May 10, 2002
Showtime May 10, 2002

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Michael Shanks, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, and Don S. Davis.

With Corin Nemec as Jonas Quinn, Carmen Argenziano as Jacob Carter / Selmak, Gary Jones as Sgt. Walter Harriman, Mel Harris as Oma Desala, Teryl Rothery as Dr. Janet Fraiser, and David Hurtubise as Tomis.

Major spoiler in this review.

The Kelowans, one of three superpowers on Langara are using Naquadria, a radioactive version of Naquadah to build weapons of mass destruction. SG1 wants to trade for some Naquadria to build defense shields but the negotiations aren't going well.

Jonas Quinn, advisor to the first minister of Kelowna, and Daniel Jackson are present when an accident releases massive amounts of radiation, which just might cause a massive explosion. Daniel shoots out the protective window, saving the day. However, he is exposed to several times the lethal dose of radiation.

The Kelowans want to blame Daniel, claiming he sabotaged the research. As Daniel lies dying, Sam, Jack, and Teal'c show their feeling for him and vow that he will not be blamed for the accident.

Eventually, Jonas Quinn gates to Earth with a gift of Naquadria and asking if he can stay. If he goes home he will be considered a traitor.

Eventually, Oma Desala makes an appearance giving Daniel a choice.

This episode stays interesting in spite of being a focused on Daniel's death. It never becomes overly melodramatic, or predictable - except for the eventual conclusion - the presence of Oma gives that away.

It is nice that the producers left the door open for Daniel's possible return.

Reviewed by Romana Drew May 25, 2021











Thor and Osiris

Sam and a frozen ancient Asgard

Revelations




Season 5 Episode 22

Directed by Martin. Wood. Written by Joseph Mallozzi & Paul Mullie.

Originally aired
Sky One May 17, 2002
Showtime May 17, 2002

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, and Don S. Davis.

With Michael Shanks as Thor (voice), Anna-Louise Plowman as Dr. Sarah Gardner / Osiris, Teryl Rothery as Heimdall (voice), and David Palffy as Anubis.

Thor engages Osiris in battle and loses. Freyr gates to Earth to inform SGC that the Asgard weapons are no longer able to penetrate Goa'uld shields so the Asgard are no longer able to enforce the Protected Planets Treaty. This is bad news for Earth.

Freyr asks SG1 to rescue Heimdall, who is under attack by Anubis.

This episode changes the playing field a bit. Anubis is now a major force in the war against the Goa'uld. The Asgard are a dying race unable to sexually reproduce and their cloning techniques are no longer effective.

Daniel is gone and SG1 is unable to find a replacement.

Thor has a device in his brain that lets Anubis learn all his secrets.

This is a good episode to end Season 5. It isn't a cliff hanger, but does end on a positive note. Maybe Daniel isn't all that far away.

Reviewed by Romana Drew May 28, 2021.









New Enemys - Old Friends
Season 6










The X-302

Ray'c

Redemption: Part 1




Season 6 Episode 1

Directed by Martin Wood. Written by Robert C. Cooper

Originally aired
SciFi June 7, 2002
Sky One June 7, 2002

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Corin Nemec, and Don S. Davis.

With Tony Amendola as Master Bra'tac, Christopher Kennedy as Dr. Larry Murphy, David Hewlett as Dr. Rodney McKay, Garry Chalk as Colonel Chekov, Neil Denis as Rya'c, Gary Jones as Sgt. Walter Harriman, Tobias Mehler as Lieutenant Graham Simmons, David Palffy as Anubis, and Dan Shea as Sargent Siler.

The Stargate opens and fails to shut down, causing a slow but constant power buildup. Given enough time, the Stargate will explode, taking a large chunk of Earth with it. With the Stargate active, there isn't any way to contact the Tok'ra, Asgard, or anyone else for help.

Quite a few things happen before the Stargate fails to shut down. Teal'c goes to Chulak to deal with family issues. Colonel Chekov insists a Russian replace Daniel Jackson. Jonas Quinn wants to join SG!. And the X-302 is ready for a test flight.

The test flight doesn't go as well as planned.

And Rodney McKay just can't stop taking jabs at Sam.

The first part of this episode deals with several unrelated problems that conveniently move people into positions to save the world. But before they can do anything, a projection of Anubis comes through the gate to gloat that he is responsible for their imminent deaths.

All of the story elements work well. In spite of being mostly set-up, the episode is quite enjoyable. I suggest watching Part 2 as soon as possible after Part 1.

Reviewed by Romana Drew June 2, 2021










The Stargate Destroyer

Teal'c, Ray'c and Bra'tac

Redemption: Part 2




Season 6 Episode 2

Directed by Martin Wood. Written by Robert C. Cooper

Originally aired
SciFi June 14, 2002
Sky One June 14, 2002

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Corin Nemec, and Don S. Davis.

With Tony Amendola as Master Bra'tac, Christopher Kennedy as Dr. Larry Murphy, David Hewlett as Dr. Rodney McKay, Garry Chalk as Colonel Chekov, Neil Denis as Rya'c, Gary Jones as Sgt. Walter Harriman, Aleks Paunovic as Shaq'rel, and Dan Shea as Sgt. Siler

In an attempt to shut down the Stargate, Rodney wants to send an EM pulse through it. Of course. Sam thinks it will only make things worse, but Hammond orders her to work with Rodney. It makes things worse.

There are two problems that must be solved. The Stargate needs to be far, far away in space before it explodes. Without a spaceship, that may be a problem. And Anubis' gate exploding device must be destroyed. But no one knows where it is.

Redemption Part 1 sets up the problems, and Part 2 solves them. No surprise there. Although Jack risks his life to save the world, Jonas is instrumental in making that possible. Teal'c and his son Ray'c come to understand and respect each other. Jack sees Jonas in a new light.

This is an exciting conclusion to a complex story. It adds dimension to the relationship between many characters, including Rodney and Sam. It also shows how powerful and dangerous Anubis is.

Reviewed by Romana Drew June 3, 2021.










Jack and Sam

Anubis' Ship

Descent




Season 6 Episode 3

Directed by Peter DeLuise. Written by Joseph Mallozzi & Paul Mullie

Originally aired
SciFi June 21, 2002
Sky One June 21, 2002

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Corin Nemec, and Don S. Davis.

With Carmen Argenziano as Jacob Carter / Selmak, Colin Cunningham as Major Paul Davis, Gary Jones as Sgt. Walter Harriman, John Shaw as Dr. Friesen, Peter DeLuise as Lieutenant Dagwood

Jacob Carter flies SG1 to investigate a Ha'tak orbiting Earth. Anubis used this ship to capture and torture Thor. Now it appears abandoned.

While Anubis attempted to download Thor's knowledge, Thor integrated his mind with the ships computer. When Anubis set the self-destruct and abandoned ship, Thor's consciousness stopped the program and sent the ship to Earth.

This would be a great find except there are ninja Jaffa aboard killing people, and the ship is about to either blowup or crash into Earth or both. And, for our heroes, there is no way off the ship.

This is an exciting episode full of surprises. Jonas has a little trouble accepting Jack's orders, but in the end, he is instrumental in saving the day.

I do question how well a spaceship could survive underwater. Things designed to fly in space must prevent the interior air pressure from causing the hull to expand or leak. Once underwater, the problem is just the opposite. Now the pressure inside is less than the pressure outside. I doubt the structure built to withstand one situation could automatically withstand the other.

Reviewed by Romana Drew June 13, 2021.










Ayiana

Antarctic Station

Frozen




Season 6 Episode 4

Directed by Martin Wood. Written by Robert C. Cooper

Originally aired
SciFi June 28, 2002
Sky One June 28, 2002

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Corin Nemec, and Don S. Davis.

With Venus Terzo as Dr. Francine Michaels, Bruce Harwood as Dr. Osbourne, Paul Perri as Dr. Woods, Dorian Harewood as Thoran, Ona Grauer as Ayiana, Gary Jones as Sgt. Walter Harriman, Teryl Rothery as Dr. Janet Fraiser

A research team in Antartica finds a frozen fifty million year old body. Not only does it appear to be human, but it is alive. SG1 and Dr. Fraiser come to investigate.

Ayiana, as the defrosted woman is called, has the power to heal the sick but not to heal herself. Since, everyone on the base has contracted a deadly illness, she is their only hope.

This isn't a fast-paced episode but it is compelling and always interesting. Who Ayiana is and why she was on Earth fifty million years ago is never explained.

I think the main purpose of the episode is to get Jack into the hands of Baal by way of the Tok'ra.

Reviewed by Romana Drew June 14, 2021










SG1 in Black

NID on the Prowl

Nightwalkers




Season 6 Episode 5

Directed by Peter DeLuise. Written by Joseph Mallozzi & Paul Mullie

Originally aired
SciFi July 12, 2002
Sky One July 12, 2002

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Corin Nemec, and Don S. Davis.

With Blu Mankuma as Sheriff Knox, Vincent Gale as Deputy / Agent Cross, Peter Anderson as Dr. Richard Flemming, and Adrian Holmes as Special Operations Sergeant.

Just before Dr. Richard Flemming's car is run off the road, he calls Sam saying he knows about Adrian Conrad. Sam, Teal'c, and Jonas are sent to investigate. Jack is still with the Tok'ra.

Flemming, now missing, worked for Immunitech Research. While searching his apartment, Sam finds a syringe full of yellowish fluid. She sends a sample back to SGC and keeps the rest.

Town's people seem suspicious but not too abnormal until after dark. Then they wake and migrate to a large building where a half-built Goa'uld ship waits. Once they wake, the town's people have no memory of their nighttime wanderings.

Before SG1 can get to the bottom of this mystery, NID agent Cross tells them that everything is under control.

This episode is an interesting puzzle. Nothing quite makes sense until all the pieces are in place.

There is good character development and interaction. Jonas learns more about humans, and he demonstrates his suburb observational skills. And, NID is thwarted once again.

Reviewed by Romana Drew June 15, 2021.










Felger abd Coombs

Khonsu

The Other Guys




Season 6 Episode 8

Directed by Martin Wood. Written by Damian Kindler

Originally aired
SciFi August 2, 2002
Sky One August 2, 2002

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Corin Nemec, and Don S. Davis.

With Patrick McKenna as Jay Felger, John Billingsley as Simon Coombs, Adam J. Harrington as Khonsu, Michael Adamthwaite as Her'ak, Gary Jones as Sgt. Walter Harriman, Martin Sims as Dol'ok, and Randy Schooley as Dr. Meyers.

SG1 babysits Dr. Jay Felger, Dr. Simon Coombs, and Dr. Meyers as they research a set of transportation rings on an unknown world. When an Al'kesh flies by, Jack orders the scientists to head back to the SGC while SG1 runs in the opposite direction. Rather than obey, the researchers follow. When SG1 gets captured, Felger and Coombs ring themselves up to the departing ship. Meyers goes home to report to Hammond.

Aboard Khonsu's Ha'tak, the bumbling nincompoops manage to avoid capture and find SG1, much to Jack's dismay. SG1 allowed themselves to be captured so they could be briefed by Khonsu, a To'kra in disguise.

And so the comedy begins. But when Khonsu is killed, the need to escape becomes very real and dangerous.

This is a great episode, with lots of humor and action. In spite of their incompetent ways, Felger and Coombs manage a few heroic acts. Felger is the perfect fawning, hero-worshiping fan. Coombs, played by Patrick McKenna (Dr. Phlox on Star Trek: Enterprise), is lovable and funny.

Reviewed by Romana Drew June 16, 2021.










Queen Symbiote

Kelmaa / Queen Egeria

Cure




Season 6 Episode10

Directed by Andy Mikita

Written by Damian Kindler

Originally aired
SciFi August 16, 2002
Sky One August 16, 2002

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Corin Nemec, and Don S. Davis.

With Peter Stebbings as Malek, Malcolm Stewart as Dollen, Gwynyth Walsh as Kelmaa / Queen Egeria, Allison Hossack as Zenna Valk, Daryl Shuttleworth as Commander Tegar, and Teryl Rothery as Dr. Janet Fraiser.

SG1 opens first contact negotiations with the Pangarans. They offer a vial of Tretonin, a cure-all and life-extending drug. SG1 offers ten gate addresses to friendly planets. The Pangarans insist upon addresses to Goa'uld controlled worlds, and things get a little testy.

While exploring where they weren't supposed to be, Teal'c and Jonas find vats full of immature Goa'uld symbiotes and an elderly queen symbiote - the source of the Tritonin and the mother of the Tok'ra. Things get a little complicated after that.

Acting much like a Jaffa Primta, Tretonin extends life and good health but is in limited supply. Once taken, it cannot be stopped or the person will die. Only a few Pangarans get Tretonin. The queen is dying. Without her, there will be no more Goa'uld symbiotes and no more Tretonin. What was once an honor is now a death sentence.

This is a quiet but interesting episode. It explores the complexities of the Pangaran society as well as giving insight into the To'kra.

The Goa'uld symbiotes always seem too big to actually fit inside a human without leaving an obvious lump, but Egeria is huge. How she gets inside Kelmaa is never explained.

Remember Tretonin. It will play an important role in future episodes.

Reviewed by Romana Drew June 17, 2021.










Julia Donovan

Prometheus

Prometheus




Season 6 Episode 11

Directed by Peter F. Woeste. Written by Joseph Mallozzi & Paul Mullie

Originally aired
SciFi August 23, 2002
Sky One August 23, 2002

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Corin Nemec, and Don S. Davis.

With George Wyner as Al Martell, Ian Tracey as Smith, Kendall Cross as Julia Donovan, Colin Cunningham as Major Paul Davis, Enid-Raye Adams as Jones, John de Lancie as Colonel Frank Simmons / Goa'uld, Bill Marchant as Adrian Conrad / Goa'uld, Jason Gaffney as Sanderson, and Michael Shanks as Thor (voice).

Reporter Julia Donovan asks Sam about a secret project called Prometheus and shows her a sample of Trinium. If anything happens to Donovan, she has rigged it, so her story goes live. Hammond contacts her producer and cuts a deal. Donovan, the producer and a camera team get a tour of the project in exchange for exclusive rights at some future undisclosed time.

Sam and Jonas take Donovan and her team for a tour of the starship Prometheus, almost completed in a huge underground hanger. The tour goes fine until the camera crew takes over and lets Adrian Conrad and Colonel Frank Simmons aboard. The producer is killed. Sam is captured. Adrian Conrad's symbiont fixes the hyperdrive and takes the ship into space, leaving Jack and Teal'c watching from the ground.

This is a fine episode with many unexpected twists and turns and a surprise ending. It is also a pivotal episode as it brings about the end of Simmons and Conrad and leads into the next episode, which brings about other changes.

Although it does set up the next episode, they are completely separate stories.

Reviewed by Romana Drew June 19, 2021.










Fifth

Thor, Jonas, Teal'c, and Jack.

Unnatural Selection




Season 6 Episode 12

Directed by Andy Mikita. Story by Robert C. Cooper & Brad Wright. Teleplay by Brad Wright

Originally aired
SciFi January 10, 2003
Sky One December 4, 2002

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Corin Nemec, and Don S. Davis.

With Ian Buchanan as First, G. Patrick Currie as Fifth, Gary Jones as Sgt. Walter Harriman, Kristina Copeland as Second, Tahmoh Penikett as Third, Rebecca Reichert as Fourth, Shannon Powell as Sixth, Dan Shea as Sgt. Siler, and Michael Shanks as Thor (voice).

The Asgard intentionally called all the Replicators to their homeworld so they could trap them in a bubble of very slow time. But those clever Replicators reversed the time dilatation machine, speeding up time. They are now free to evolve while the rest of the universe stands still, from their perspective.

The Asgard homeworld is a ball of Replicator blocks with one structure housing the time dilatation machine, apparently, turned off. With Thor's help, SG1 lands the Prometheus on the surface and then sets out to turn on the time dilatation device again, trapping the Replicators in slow time, freeing the Asgard to find a solution.

Inside the structure, SG1 meets human-like Replicators, un-killable denizens bent on consuming everything everywhere and proud of it.

Although this is a very watchable episode, interesting and exciting, it can be a bit hard to believe. I understand that the speed of light is supposed to be constant, not the speed of time. Time can run faster or slower in some situations, but time bubbles just don't make a lot of sense. However, they play a big role in many Stargate episodes.

Reviewed by Romana Drew June 20, 2021.










Bug

Another Bug

Sight Unseen




Season 6 Episode 13

Directed by Peter F. Woeste. Story by Ron Wilkerson. Teleplay by Damian Kindler

Originally aired
SciFi January 17, 2003
Sky One December 11, 2002

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Corin Nemec, and Don S. Davis .

With Jody Racicot as Vernon Sharpe, Gary Jones as Sgt. Walter Harriman, Teryl Rothery as Dr. Janet Fraiser, and Betty Linde as Mrs. Sharpe.

SG1 returns with an ancient device from a long-abandoned planet. When Jonas touches the device, it lights up but doesn't seem to do anything. Jonas sees a big flying creature buzz around and then go through a wall. When a search of the SGC turns up nothing, SG1 is told to take a vacation. Jack goes fishing. The rest stay. Then more bugs are seen by more people.

This is a great, funny story. It shows how quickly a contagion can spread and the havoc it can cause.

The bugs are harmless, but they scare people into doing stupid things. In one case, a man is driving down the roadway when a large, green creature with a sucker mouth lands on his windshield, blocking his view. Instead of stopping, he careens all over the place, eventually crashing into a sign.

Betty Linde does a great job as Mrs. Sharpe, Vernon's grandmother. She cares for Vernon, but her grasp of reality is just a bit off.

Reviewed by Romana Drew June 21, 2021.










Jack and Senator Kinsey

Sam and the Minmic Devices

Smoke & Mirrors.




Season 6 Episode 14

Directed by Peter DeLuise. Story by Katharyn Powers. Teleplay by Joseph Mallozzi & Paul Mullie

Originally aired
SciFi January 24, 2003
Sky One December 18, 2002

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Corin Nemec, and Don S. Davis.

Colin Cunningham as Major Paul Davis, Peter Flemming as Agent Malcolm Barrett, Ronny Cox as Senator Robert Kinsey, Teryl Rothery as Dr. Janet Fraiser, Johnny Cuthbert as Agent Devlin, Peter Kelamis as Dr. Langham, and John Mann as Luthor.

After Senator Kinsey is killed, Jack is arrested. A surveillance video shows Jack leaving the building after the shooting. The gun is found in his cabin. He claims he was in Minnesota fishing.

Sam, Teal'c, and Jonas set out to find the truth. The alien mimic devices are missing from Area 51, giving them a clue as to how Jack could appear to be in two places at the same time. But they still need to figure out who in the NID did this and why.

This is a bit of a who done it, with disguised characters and differing levels of subterfuge. It stays interesting and engaging throughout. With Jack in prison, Sam, Teal'c, and Jonas have to opportunity to take the lead.

In the end, Sam uses a mimic device, pretending to be Devlin, one of the bad guys. When it fails, she smiles, knowing it wouldn't last long. When wearing the device, does she hear her voice or Devlin's. Does she see her hands and feet or his? Either way, it must be a bit unnerving.

Reviewed by Romana Drew June 25, 2021.










Maybourne

Jack and a Skeleton

Paradise Lost




Season 6 Episode 15

Directed by William Gereghty. Written by Robert C. Cooper

Originally aired
SciFi January 31, 2003
Sky One January 8, 2003

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Corin Nemec, and Don S. Davis.

With Tom McBeath as Harry Maybourne, Bill Dow as Dr. Bill Lee, Gary Jones as Sgt. Walter Harriman, Dan Shea as Sgt. Siler,

Mayborne is at it again. He cons SG1 into taking him through the gate to a weapons cache and only he can open the door. It turns out that the 'door' is a transporter to a utopian society where Maybourne intends to retire. Not only is it not a society of any kind, but Jack follows him through.

Stranded in a dilapidated village, surrounded by long-dead corpses, they go crazy and attempt to kill each other.

Mayborne is a complex character, well played by Tom McBeath. He is intelligent, manipulative, and devious. Although he has done illegal things, he is not inherently evil.

Jack's feelings toward Maybourne are also complex. He has multiple opportunities to capture Maybourne and put him back in prison, but he never does. Of course, Maybourne is often useful and typically not a threat.

This episode explores their relationship. I always think this episode will spend too much time with Jack and Maybourne, but it doesn't. Instead, it moves along quite nicely.

Reviewed by Romana Drew June 26, 2021.










Nirrti

Wodan

Metamorphosis




Season 6 Episode 16

Directed by Peter DeLuise. Story by Jacqueline Samuda & James Tichenor. Teleplay by James Tichenor.

Originally aired
SciFi February 7, 2003
Sky One January 15, 2003

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Corin Nemec, and Don S. Davis.

With Jacqueline Samuda as Nirrti, Alex Zahara as Eggar, Dion Johnstone as Wodan, Raoul Ganeev as Lt. Colonel Sergei Evanov, Gary Jones as Sgt. Walter Harriman, Teryl Rothery as Dr. Janet Fraiser, Alejandro Rae as Alebran, Jacquie Janzen as Lt. Rush, and Dan Payne as Jaffa Commander.

Nirrti is at it again. The Russian SG team brings Alebran back from P3X-367. He says that Nirrti killed most of his people and is experimenting on the rest. Before he can do anything more, he dissolves, leaving a puddle of water.

SG1 and the Russians return to rid the world, and perhaps the galaxy, of Nirrti.

Nirrti's subjects may look horrible, but they have strong mental abilities. And soon capture all the people from Earth, putting several through her DNA altering machine.

The makeup in this episode is quite good. Her subjects look convincingly disfigured. A couple seem to have trouble talking through their fake teeth. Nirrti's costume also deserves comment. As a woman, cleavage doesn't turn me on, but that top must have been uncomfortable.

This is a well-paced and well-acted episode, but it is rather unpleasant to watch. Both the subjects and the SG personnel are abused. Although, the ending is immensely satisfying.

Reviewed by Romana Drew July 2, 2021.










The Firehouse

The Battlefield

The Changeling




Season 6 Episode 19

Directed by Martin Wood. Written by Christopher Judge

Originally aired
SciFi February 28, 2003
Sky One February 5, 2003

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Corin Nemec, and Don S. Davis .

With Tony Amendola as Brae / Master Bra'tac, Carmen Argenziano as Jacob Carter / Selmak, Musetta Vander as Shauna, Peter Williams as Doctor / Accident Victim / Apophis, Michael Shanks as Dr. Daniel Jackson, and Teryl Rothery as Dr. Janet Fraiser.

Teal'c's uncle Bra needs a kidney. While waiting in the hospital to donate one, Teal'c's dreams about the SGC. Then he is in the SGC dreaming about being in the hospital. The dreams are so intense he doesn't know which world is real. Then Apophis shows up. And then Daniel makes an appearance. In one world, Teal'c is human - a firefighter, in the other, a Jaffa.

Obviously, something is wrong with Teal'c, but it isn't clear until very near the end of the story.

This episode works fairly well. Although, it gets a bit tedious as it shifts from reality to reality. For a moment, Teal'c and Bra'tak lie next to each other on a battlefield full of dead Jaffa. Then it's back to his human world.

This is the episode that introduces Tretonin, eventually freeing the Jaffa from Goa'uld symbionts.

Although Michael Shanks left the series, he continues to make guest appearances as his ascended self. And he is still Thor's voice.

Reviewed by Romana Drew June 26, 2021.










The Prometheus Surround

Ashwan

Memento




Season 6 Episode 20

Directed by Peter DeLuise. Written by Damian Kindler

Originally aired
SciFi March 7, 2003
Sky One February 12, 2003

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Corin Nemec, and Don S. Davis.

With Robert Foxworth as Chairman Ashwan, John Novak as Colonel William Ronson, Miguel Fernandes as Commander Kalfas, Ingrid Kavelaars as Major Erin Gant, Alex Diakun as Tarek Solamon, and Ray Galletti as Major Peter DeLouise.

The Prometheus is on a hyperspace shakedown cruise to P7X-009 when it drops out of hyperspace unexpectedly. With the hyperspace buffer irreparably damaged, they fly a short distance to a planet that should have a Stargate.

The Naquadria reactor overloads. They get it off the ship before it explodes. But the explosion causes an electromagnetic pulse that damages systems on the Prometheus and the planet.

The locals, believing they are under attack, send missiles to destroy the ship. Without working shields or weapons, the Prometheus is a sitting duck. Jack makes a desperate attempt to talk to the inhabitants.

Once they manage to land, the locals are none too happy about their search for the Stargate.

This is an exploration of a society that has done everything possible to erase its past and all knowledge of the Goa'uld who brought them from Earth. It works pretty well, although Kalfas is a bit tedious.

Normally, the fact that everyone, everywhere, speaks English isn't too bothersome. Given the Stargate universe, that wouldn't be the case. Each planet would have a different language. However, that would make the storytelling rather difficult. Star Trek has the universal translator. Doctor Who has the psychic powers or the Tardis. Stargate just ignores the problem.

Reviewed by Romana Drew June 27,2021










Lord Mot

More Mot

Prophecy




Season 6 Episode 21

Directed by William Waring. Written by Joseph Mallozzi & Paul Mullie

Originally aired
SciFi March 14, 2003
Sky One February 19, 2003

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Corin Nemec, and Don S. Davis.

With Thomas Kopache as Ellori, Victor Talmadge as Lord Mot, Tom Scholte as Chazen, Gary Jones as Sgt. Walter Harriman, Rob Lee as Major Pierce, Teryl Rothery as Dr. Janet Fraiser, Sarah Edmondson as Natania, Johannah Newmarch as Sina, Karin Konoval as Dr. Sandy Van Densen, and Dan Shea as Sgt. Siler.

Jonas has visions of the future, and they come true. While Jack, Sam, and Teal'c help the people of P4S-237 free themselves from Lord Mot, Jonas is stuck in sickbay with headaches and visions. He has a brain tumor, but he thinks it's Nirrti's doing and doesn't want it removed. His visions may be useful, but his attempts to prevent the events often provoke them.

Mot arrives and captures Jack, Sam, Teal'c, and SG 15. He plans to send a bomb through the Stargate to destroy the SGC.

Victor Talmadge does a wonderful job as Lord Mot. Although he doesn't do much other than talk, he is evil incarnate. Such a good villain. And he comes to a good end, in the end.

This is an exciting episode with lots of different things going on. Just the right amount of time is spent on the planet and with Jonas.

Every one of Jonas' visions is about something bad. If the visions were random, wouldn't they also be about mundane events, or even positive ones. Of course, that might not be a very exciting story.

Reviewed by Romana Drew July 11, 2021










Daniel facing Anubis

Anubis

Full Circle




Season 6 Episode 22

Directed by Martin Wood. Written by Robert C. Cooper

Originally aired
SciFi March 21, 2003
Sky One February 19, 2003

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Corin Nemec, and Don S. Davis.

With Alexis Cruz as Skaara, Gary Jones as Sgt. Walter Harriman, Michael Shanks as Dr. Daniel Jackson, David Palffy as Anubis, Sean Amsing as Tobay, Vince Crestejo as Yu-huang Shang Ti, and Michael Adamthwaite as Her'ak.

Daniel is at it again. Even though he has ascended, Daniel appears on an elevator to tell Jack that Anubis is on his way to Abydos to find the Eye of Ra. He needs it to power a weapon that will destroy all the other System Lords.

SG1 goes to Abydos to find the Eye of Ra. They find the Abydonians well and meet up with Skaara. Then Anubis shows up, as does Lord Yu. At that point, things go south.

This is the last episode of season 6. It beings a few changes to the Stargate world. SG1's relationship with Skaara, Daniel, and Anubis are altered.

This is an exciting episode with great special effects. It also has some rather touching scenes.

One of the things that keeps Stargate fresh as the season's pass is the evolution of the bad guys. And the maturation of the good guys. This episode does a bit of both. Without it, the first episode of next season won't make much sense.

Reviewed by Romana Drew July 13, 2021.







Change is Coming
Season 7










Daniel

Daniel and Jonas

Fallen




Season 7 Episode 1

Directed by Martin Wood. Written by Robert C. Cooper

Originally aired
SciFi June 13, 2003
Sky One June 13, 2003

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Don S. Davis, and Michael Shanks.

With Corin Nemec as Jonas Quinn, George Touliatos as Shamda, Kevan Ohtsji as Oshu, David Palffy as Anubis, Michael Adamthwaite as Her'ak, Gary Jones as Sgt. Walter Harriman, Teryl Rothery as Dr. Janet Fraiser, Vince Crestejo as Yu-huang Shang Ti, Eric Breker as Colonel Reynolds, Charles Singh as Khordib, and Johannah Newmarch as Sina.

Jonas believes that the tablet from Abydos says that the Lost city is really the City of the Lost. He thinks he knows the gate address, so off they go.

They find ruins, a primitive society, and Daniel. Although Daniel doesn't remember anything about being Ascended, he can now read Ancient. The tablet says that the city is hidden, not lost. Which doesn't help much.

The Tok'ra send a basic layout of Anubis' ship. Guess what? It has a cooling vent leading to the power core of his superweapon. And off they go again

This is a fine episode. It's both emotionally engaging and exciting. It even has a great homage to Star Wars. Although Jonas is a wonderful character, one I really like, he doesn't have the gentle sensitivity of Daniel. It is nice to have Daniel back.

This is a two-part story, and it ends in a cliffhanger.

Reviewed by Romana Drew June 16, 2021.










The Lanagara Political Leaders

Anubis' Ship

Homecoming




Season 7 Episode 2

Directed by Martin Wood. Written by Joseph Mallozzi & Paul Mullie

Originally aired
SciFi June 13, 2003
Sky One June 13, 2003
Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Don S. Davis, and Michael Shanks.

With Corin Nemec as Jonas Quinn, Cliff Simon as Ba'al, Kevan Ohtsji as Oshu, David Palffy as Anubis, Michael Adamthwaite as Her'ak, Doug Abrahams as Commander Hale, Adrian Hough as Goa'uld Lieutenant, Gillian Barber as Ambassador Dreylock, Gary Jones as Sgt. Walter Harriman, Glynis Davies as Ambassador Noor, and Jan Bos as Ambassador Sevarin.

Daniel and Jonas are still on Anubis' ship. Teal'c is on Lord Yu's ship, telling him that Anubis' weapon has been destroyed, and this is his chance to kill Anubis.

It almost works, except Yu backs out at the last moment, choosing to take a nap in his sarcophagus. So Teal'c and Oshu, Yu's first prime, ask Baal for help.

In the meantime, Anubis learns that Langara, Jonas' homeworld, has Naquadria. He goes there, wreaking havoc on the population. Jack and Sam go to Langara to help.

This is a great conclusion to the previous episode. The action takes place in several places, but it never gets confusing. It is fast-paced with lots of different twists and surprises. The two episodes don't need to be watched back to back. But don't wait too long between episodes, or you may have trouble remembering all the characters and places. There are many.

Reviewed by Romana Drew July 17, 2021.










Jack and Jack

Jack

Fragile Balance




Season 7 Episode 3

Directed by Peter DeLuise. Story by Peter DeLuise & Michael Greenburg. Teleplay by Damian Kindler

Originally aired
SciFi June 20, 2003
Sky One June 20, 2003

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Don S. Davis, and

With Carmen Argenziano as Jacob Carter / Selmak, Michael Welch as Young Jack O'Neill, Teryl Rothery as Dr. Janet Fraiser, Gregory Bennett as Lt. Col. Harlan Beck, Tom Heaton as Werner, Poppi Reiner as Pamela Ambrose, Ralph Alderman as Shop Owner, and Peter DeLuise as Loki (voice).

Jack wakes up to find he is now a fifteen-year-old boy. It takes a while to convince Hammond and the rest that he is Jack O'Neill. Although he has memories of an alien abduction, possibly by Asgard, finding out what really happened and why isn't easy. After a little research, Daniel and Teal'c discover at least eight people who have the same memories.

As it turns out, not all the Asgard scientists are respectful of the rights of humans, especially the one named, quite appropriately, Loki.

This is a fun episode. Michael Welch does a fabulous job as Jack. He has just the right attitudes and expressions. It also shows that not all Asgard are as wise, successful, or ethical as Thor. Peter DeLuise does occasional cameos or even speaking parts. In this episode, he is Loki's voice.

Reviewed by Romana Drew July 18, 2021.










Jack and Teal'c at the Dome Boundry

Sam and Pallan at the Central Computer

Revisions




Season 7 Episode 5

Directed by Martin Wood. Written by Joseph Mallozzi & Paul Mullie

Originally aired
SciFi July 11, 2003
Sky One July 11, 2003

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Don S. Davis, and Michael Shanks.

With Christopher Heyerdahl as Pallan, Peter LaCroix as Kendrick, Tiffany Lyndall-Knight as Evalla, Liam Ranger as Nevin, Gary Jones as Sgt. Walter Harriman, Wendy Noel as Councilwoman, Michael Robinson as Councilman #1, Patrick Keating as Councilman #2, and Finn Michael as Councilman #3.

P3X-289 has a deadly atmosphere, yet there is a dome not too far from the Stargate. Inside the dome, the world is beautiful, so SG1 investigates.

Everybody in the town wears a crescent-shaped device on their temple. It links to the central computer. The townspeople think they are free to do whatever they want, but that isn't quite true. Even so, it seems like an idyllic life until people go missing and no one except Sam, Daniel, Jack, and Teal'c remember them.

This is a cautionary tale about trusting technology without question. It's also about complacency, leaving your future in the hands of someone or something else, rather using your mind.

This is a well-crafted and thought-provoking episode. It was filmed in at "Fantasy Gardens", a theme park in Richmond, British Colombia. Unfortunately, it no longer exists.

Reviewed by Romana Drew July 19, 2021.










Daniel and Chaka

Unas Leader

Enemy Mine




Season 7 Episode 7

Directed by Peter DeLuise. Written by Peter DeLuise

Originally aired
SciFi July 25, 2003
Sky One July 25, 2003

With Richard Dean Anderson, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Don S. Davis, and Michael Shanks.

With Michael Rooker as Colonel Edwards, Steven Williams as General Vidrine, Alex Zahara as Iron Shirt, Kavan Smith as Major Evan Lorne, G. Patrick Currie as Chaka, Gary Jones as Sgt. Walter Harriman, Michael Gordin Shore as Lt. Menard, Dean Redman as Lt. Woeste, and Kirk Caouette as Lt. Ritter.

While mining Naquadah on P3X-403, Unas attack and kill one of the miners. Daniel wants to make peace with the Unas, but the miners and the military are not all that enthusiastic. Daniel recruits Chaka to help. It almost works.

Alex Zahara, who plays the Unas leader, also plays Warrick Finn in Space Race, Eggar in Metamorphosis, Shy One in Beast of Burden, Alien Leader in Foothold, and Xe'ls in Spirits.

This episode is a little slow in the beginning. The military and miners are inflexible and predictable. They refuse to believe that the Unas are any more than extremely primitive creatures that can be easily tossed aside. It is a bit of a lesson in judging a book by its cover.

Once it gets started, the episode gets interesting, and it has a great ending.

Reviewed by Romana Drew July 29, 2021.










Warrick Finn

Hebridan

Space Race




Season 7 Episode 8

Directed by Andy Mikita. Written by Damian Kindler

Originally aired
SciFi August 1, 2003
Sky One August 1, 2003

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Don S. Davis, and Michael Shanks.

With Scott MacDonald as Golon Jarlath, Alex Zahara as Warrick Finn, G. Patrick Currie as Eamon, Terence Kelly as Miles Hagan, and Allan Lysell as Del Tynan.

Warrick Finn, from Forsaken, asks SCG for help to win a race, the Loop of Kon Garat sponsored by Tech Con. In exchange, he will give them access to ion drive technology. Since Earth has been unsuccessful in obtaining that technolgy from the Hebridan government, participation in the race is approved. Sam can't wait.

Ships must compete against attack drones, fly close to the sun, and do other dangerous maneuvers. Behind the scenes, a Tech Con Exec has sabotaged several ships, Sam and Warrick's included.

This is a fun story about ruthless competition. It isn't until later in the episode that the underlying current of bigotry and intolerance shows up.

The episode is well-written and well-paced, with just the right amount of humor. It is fun, exciting, and the ending is quite satisfying.

Reviewed by Romana Drew July 30, 2021.










Felger and Sam

Chloe calming Felger

Avenger 2.0




Season 7 Episode 9

Directed by Martin Wood. Written by Joseph Mallozzi & Paul Mullie

Originally aired
SciFi August 8, 2003
Sky One August 8, 2003

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Don S. Davis, and Michael Shanks.

With Patrick McKenna as Jay Felger, Jocelyne Loewen as Dr. Chloe Angstrom, and Gary Jones as Sgt. Walter Harriman.

Jay Felger, from The Other Guys, is at it again. When his super-weapon fails, he has to come up with something fast or get fired. He concocts a virus to disable a Stargate by scrambling the gate codes. The perfect gift for Baal.

However, Stargates have a correlative update system the keeps them all using the same coordinates. The virus triggers a correlative update, scrambling the codes on every Stargate. Because SGC doesn't have a DHD, they never get the update. Now they have the only gate that can dial out.

Jack and Teal'c are off-world being attacked. Daniel is on another world about to drown in a flood. Neither can dial home.

Patrick McKenna does a fine job as Felger, brilliant but clueless and inept. Instead of playing off Simon Coombs, as he did in , The Other Guys, this time it is his lovely partner, Dr. Chloe Angstrom. And he still has ridiculous daydreams.

Although it is difficult to see how Felger manages to keep his job, the episode works fine.

Reviewed by Romana Drew August 4, 2021.










Ishta

Neith and Nesa

Birthright


Birthright

Season 7 Episode 10

Directed by Peter F. Woeste. Written by Christopher Judge

Originally aired
SciFi August 15, 2003
Sky One August 15, 2003

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Don S. Davis, and Michael Shanks.

With Jolene Blalock as Ishta, Christine Adams as Mala, Kathleen Duborg as Neith, Kirsten Zien as Nesa, and Teryl Rothery as Dr. Janet Fraiser.

SG1 meets with a Jaffa who wants to help the resistance. He is killed by a group of Jaffa that pin down SG1. Just when all is lost, a bunch of female Jaffa saves them. They follow the women to their world.

The leader, Ishta (Jolene Blalock, T'Pol on Star Trek Enterprise), is the high priestess for Lord Moloc. Moloc demands that all female Jaffa be killed as soon as they are born. She saves as many babies as she can and brings them here. Then they kill Jaffa to get symbionts for the girls as they mature.

Written by Christopher Judge, this episode explores the other side of Jaffa life. In all previous episodes, unless they involve Teal'c's family, there are few if any female Jaffa. These women are strong and resourceful, but killing to obtain symbionts is wrong on many levels. And there are no males in their world.

This is an interesting episode with good character development. Not only does it look at the female side of the Jaffa, but it also gives Teal'c a chance for romance.

Reviewed by Romana Drew August 6, 2021.










Grace

Sam and Imaginary Jack

Grace




Season 7 Episode 13

Directed by Peter F. Woeste. Written by Damian Kindler

Originally aired
SciFi January 16, 2004
Sky One January 13, 2004

With Richard Dean Anderson, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Don S. Davis, and Michael Shanks.

With Carmen Argenziano as Jacob Carter / Selmak, Ingrid Kavelaars as Major Erin Gant, John Novak as Colonel William Ronson, Sasha Pieterse as Grace, and Craig Veroni as Weapons Officer.

On its way back to Earth, the Prometheus encounters an alien ship that opens fire. Badly outgunned, the Prometheus takes refuge in a nebula. Sam is knocked out. When she wakes, the rest of the crew is missing, and the engines refuse to start.

She tries to figure out what happened, but her head injury makes thinking difficult. She talks to Daniel, Teal'c, and Jack. Even though they aren't really there. She also talks to an enigmatic girl named Grace.

As much as this feels like Sam's dream, it isn't. Although Daniel, Teal'c, and Jack are not real. The crew really is missing, and the ship really is stuck.

I keep expecting this episode to break down and get boring, but it never does. Although Amanda Tapping does a fine job, her acting isn't what holds the episode together. It is a mystery. What is real, what isn't? Will she wake up, or is she already awake and in trouble? And who is Grace?

Reviewed by Romana Drew August 8, 2021.










Kianna Cyr

Jonas Quinn

Fallout




Season 7 Episode 14

Directed by Martin Wood. Story by Corin Nemic. Teleplay by Joseph Mallozzi and Paul Mullie

Originally aired
SciFi January 23, 2004
Sky One January 13, 2004

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Don S. Davis, and Michael Shanks.

With Corin Nemec as Jonas Quinn, Emily Holmes as Kianna Cyr, Gillian Barber as First Minister Dreylock, Patricia Drake as Lucia Tarthus, Julian Christopher as Vin Eremal, and Bill Nikolai as Technician Vern Alberts.

Jonas asks for help because his world is about to explode.

Naquadria is not natural to his world. A Goa'uld created it by adding a catalyst to a naturally occurring deposit of Naquadah. When the Kelownas tested their Naquadria bomb, they inadvertently caused the same chain reaction in a large and deep deposit of Naquadah. The increasing heat and pressure of the deep vein will soon cause the entire deposit to explode, destroying the world.

The solution is to ride an excavator deep down near a fault in the vein and set off a small nuke. That should separate the vein and prevent the conversion from continuing.

There are a few holes in this plot. Why doesn't the nuke set off the already converted Naquadria? How do you burrow through a vein of lava? Wouldn't lava gum up all the cutting blades? Even with the help of Tok'ra tunnel crystals, the digger goes faster than is believable. And, how do they deploy the crystals? The hatch is on the floor of the control area, not the pointed end of the digger.

Set all that aside, and this is a good episode. Lots of tension and good character development. Even the Goa'uld has many redeeming characteristics.

The story was written by Corin Nemec, who plays Jonas Quinn. I find it interesting when actors write stories about their characters.

This is, of course, not the first time writers have envisioned burrowing deep into the Earth. Edgar Rice Burrows wrote At the Earth's Core in 1914. More recently, the move, The Core, took people deep underground. There may be others I can't remember. I'm not counting Journey to the Center of the Earth and that ilk because they don't use a drill or burrowing machine.

At least, in this episode, our heroes encountered hot toxic gases, not strange people and new worlds.

Reviewed by Romana Drew Aug 11, 2021.










Pete and Sam

Daniel and Osiris

Chimera




Season 7 Episode 15

Directed by William Waring. Story by Robert C. Cooper. Teleplay by Damian Kindler

Originally aired
SciFi January 30, 2004
Sky One January 20, 2004

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Don S. Davis, and Michael Shanks.

With Anna-Louise Plowman as Dr. Sarah Gardner / Osiris, David DeLuise as Pete Shanahan, and Paul Jarrett as Special Agent Farrity.

Daniel's having dreams about his old girlfriend, Sarah Gardner, who is now a Goa'uld called Osiris. At the same time, Sam has a new boyfriend.

Osiris tries to get Daniel to remember the location of the Lost City of the Ancients.

As much as Sam likes Pete, she can't tell him anything about her work. The secrecy comes between them.

It is always a joy to watch Anna-Louise Plowman play Osiris. She is the perfect combination of sweetness and evil.

Pete Shanahan is played by David DeLuise. David is the brother of Peter DeLuise, who produces SG1 and who writes and/or directs many of the episodes. The resemblance is obvious. Both have voices reminiscent of their father, Dom Deluise.

The two stories seem to be completely separate until the end.

Chimera is an odd title. The Chimera is a monster in Greek mythology. But the word also means something that is wished for but is only an illusion or impossible to achieve. Which, in some ways, might apply to both storylines.

This is a good episode with lots of character development. We get to see a different side of Sam. And it sets Daniel thinking about the Lost City.

Reviewed by Romana Drew August 12, 2021.










Kull Warrior

Sam and Jack Rising from the not so dead.

Death Knell




Season 7 Episode 16

Directed by Peter DeLuise. Written by Peter DeLuise

Originally aired
SciFi February 6, 2004
Sky One January 27, 2004

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Don S. Davis, and Michael Shanks.

With Carmen Argenziano as Jacob Carter / Selmak, Sebastian Spence as Delek, Mark Gibbon as M'zel, Gary Jones as Sgt. Walter Harriman, Eric Breker as Colonel Reynolds, Nels Lennarson as Major Green, Sam MacMillan as Lt. Glenn, Dan Shea as Sgt. Siler, and Dan Payne as Kull Warrior.

A Kull Warrior is after Sam.

Kull Warriors were developed by Anubis and are impossible to kill. Sam and Jacob are developing a weapon to stop the Warriors when the Alpha site is attacked. At some point, the self-destruct went off, leaving the few remaining survivors stranded and Sam missing.

Much of this episode involves finding Sam and evading the Kull Warrior. The rest tries to solve the mystery of who told Anubis, Tok'ra or rebel Jaffa, and why the Alpha site blew up.

As it turns out, the Tok'ra and the rebel Jaffa don't get along, don't trust each other, and aren't all that cooperative.

This episode would quickly get dull if it followed Sam for too long, but it doesn't. There are enough hints to make sure the audience knows she is alive. But finding her and figuring out who told Anubis gets complicated.

After a while, the bickering between Delek and M'zel gets a bit tedious. But even that doesn't last too long.

As the sand and dirt poured out of the Kull Warrior that Sam shot, I couldn't help but think about the actor inside that suit. He must have been really dirty by the end of the scene. I wonder how many times he had to get loaded up with sand so it could pour out like that.

Reviewed by Romana Drew August 13, 2021










Anna/Sekhmet and Daniel

Dr. Keffler

Resurrection




Season 7 Episode 19

Directed by Amanda Tapping. Written by Michael Shanks

Originally aired
SciFi February 27, 2004
Sky One February 17, 2004

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Don S. Davis, and Michael Shanks.

With Kristen Dalton as Anna / Sekhmet, Brad Greenquist as Dr. Keffler, Peter Flemming as Agent Malcolm Barrett, Bill Dow as Dr. Bill Lee, Martin Novotny as NID Interrogation-Room Guard,

A rogue NID operation goes bad, kills lots of people, and nearly destroys Colorado.

After almost everyone at the NID site is killed, SG1 arrives to investigate. They find a naive young woman named Anna locked in a cell, and Dr. Keffler, a most odious individual.

While investigating a storage room, Daniel and Dr. Lee find a locked chest. Believing it to be important, they open it. It's a bomb set to go off in a few hours.

Annna is more than she appears. She doesn't have a Goa'uld symbiont, but she is still part Goa'uld.

Dr. Keffler is not only a complex character but a thoroughly evil one. Michael Shanks does a great job of writing his dialogue. Brad Greenquist's Keffler is disturbingly creepy and loathsome. Perfect for the role.

A ticking timebomb adds urgency to the episode. But the classic bit about disarming the bomb at the last second with a guess as to which wire to cut or button to push is avoided in a most delightful way.

There are a few plot holes. Keffler's door isn't locked. It isn't even closed. His escape is way too easy. No guard would be that stupid. Anna's escape could also have been easily prevented. Not all the walls of her cage were solid.

In spite of the holes, this is a great episode. Congrats to Michael Shanks' writing and Amanda Tapping's directing.

Reviewed by Romana Drew August 18, 2021.










Jack Getting a Brain Upgrade

Jack in the Ancient Chair

Lost City: Part




Season 7 Episode 21

Directed by Martin Wood. Written by Brad Wright & Robert C. Cooper

Originally aired
SciFi March 12, 2004
Sky One March 2, 2004

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Don S. Davis, and Michael Shanks.

With William Devane as President Henry Hayes, Jessica Steen as Dr. Elizabeth Weir, Tony Amendola as Master Bra'tac, David Palffy as Anubis, Gary Jones as Sgt. Walter Harriman, Ronny Cox as Vice President Robert Kinsey, Eric Breker as Colonel Reynolds, and Dan Payne as Kull Warrior

P3X-439 has an Ancient Repository of Knowledge. The Asgard are MIA, and Anubis is on the way. Now that Kensey is VP, he intends to have his way with the Stargate program. Hammond retires, and Dr. Elizabeth Weir replaces him.

Jack once again has the knowledge of the Ancients downloaded into his brain.

Sam, Teal'c, Daniel, and Hammond, meet at Jack's house in a scene that shows how much they care for and support each other. This is a good scene as the team will never again be the same.

This episode introduces the character of Elizabeth Weir, who plays a major role in Atlantis. However, Lost City Part 1 and 2 are Jessica Steen's only episodes. She is replaced by Torri Higginson in season 8.

I especially liked the scene where Jack asks Daniel for a seven-letter word. The crossword hint is "Up, down, charmed, blank," and Daniel answers "Strange." Jack doesn't get it. I wonder how many viewers understood, or know that "top" and "bottom" also belong on that list.

This is a good episode. Don't wait too long to watch part 2. I suggest watching it right after this one.

Reviewed by Romana Drew Aug 19, 2021.










Kensey and Weir

The Battle over Antartica

Lost City: Part 2




Season 7 Episode 22

Directed by Martin Wood. Written by Brad Wright & Robert C. Cooper

Originally aired
SciFi March 19, 2004
Sky One March 9, 2004

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Don S. Davis, and Michael Shanks.

With William Devane as President Henry Hayes, Jessica Steen as Dr. Elizabeth Weir, Tony Amendola as Master Bra'tac, James McDaniel as General Francis Maynard, Marc Worden as Ronan, David Palffy as Anubis, Gary Jones as Sgt. Walter Harriman, John P. Jumper as Self, Ronny Cox as Vice President Robert Kinsey, and Dan Payne as Kull Warrior

Jack associates each symbol on the Stargate with a sound, giving Sam and Daniel the clues they need to dial Praclarush Taonas. They believe it to be the location of the Lost City, but the gate won't open.

With Anubis headed for Earth, they can't take the Prometheus to Praclarush Taonas, so they borrower a Jaffa Tel'tak. Praclarush Taonas turns out to be a good imitation of hell. But there is one habitable dome left. Jack grabs a power module. Then they all head back to Earth where Anubis is about to destroy everything.

This is an exciting episode. Many things are not quite what they appear to be at first. It ends with a fine battle scene. But Jack is left frozen in stasis with no way to revive him.

Take a good look at the power module. They make Naquadah generators look puny and weak.

This is Don Davis' last episode as the leader of the SGC. He does return in future episodes for a few guest appearances. He quit for health reasons. It is hard to imagine the SGC without him.

I have a great fondness for General Hammond. He looks, sounds, and has a personality very similar to my uncle Ken. Uncle Ken worked on designing the Space Shuttle. He passed away many years ago. Don Davis died in 2008.

Don't wait too long to watch the first episode of season 8. In many ways, it is an extension of Lost City.

Reviewed by Romana Drew August 19, 2021.





The Good, the Bad, and the Ascended
Season 8








Weir and Daniel

Amaterasu, Camulus, and Yu-huang Shang Ti Sam and Fifth

Jack onThor's Ship Replicator Sam

New Order




Season 8, Episode 1 & 2

Directed by Andy Mikita. Written by Joseph Mallozzi & Paul Mullie

Originally aired
SciFi July 9, 2004
Sky One July 9, 2004

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Michael Shanks, and Torri Higginson.

With David DeLuise as Pete Shanahan, Barclay Hope as Colonel Lionel Pendergast, Chelah Horsdal as Lt. Womack, G. Patrick Currie as Fifth, Gary Jones as Sgt. Walter Harriman, James Bamford as Eighth, Kevan Ohtsji as Oshu, Kira Clavell as Amaterasu, Steve Bacic as Camulus, and Vince Crestejo as Yu-huang Shang Ti,

Although New Order sometimes airs as two episodes, it was initially broadcast as a two-hour special. I have reviewed it as one episode.

Weir now heads the SGC. Jack is still frozen in Antarctica. Because Anubis' attack in Antarctica couldn't be kept secret, representatives of several governments are argueing about the Ancient weapon.

Sam and Teal'c take a Tel'tak to Hala, where the replicators were imprisoned in a time dilation field, to find the Asgard, thinking someone must be guarding that world. Instead of a planet, they find a black hole and get sucked in. After being rescued by Thor, they watch as a few replicators escape the black hole.

The Replicators get organized and attack Thor's ship, kidnapping Sam. Then they head for Orilla, the Asgard's current homeworld.

Back on Earth, Three System Lords, Amaterasu, Camulus, and Yu, come to the SGC, asking for help defeating Baal. Daniel discovers that they have sent a ship to test Earth's defense capabilities. Weir arrests them, but the ship is on the way.

Forewarned of the danger, the Asgard manage to destroy the Replicator ship. But some of the replicator blocks fall to the surface and start taking over Orilla, where Fifth has Sam in a love/hate relationship.

Eventually, Thor does revive Jack with the knowledge of the Ancients still in his brain.

This is an exciting although somewhat convoluted episode. There is more than enough story to fill the entire two hours.

A few questions remain unanswered. Replicator blocks rained down on Orilla, but Sam landed there too, so it must have been more than just random blocks. People don't do so well in the vacuum of space, nor do they survive a fall through the atmosphere. And Fifth must have more lives than a proverbial cat.

The System Lord's ship never arrives. Their threat to force a test of the Ancient weapon seems to have petered out without an obvious explanation. Of course, there is so much going on that this didn't occur to me at the time.

When replicator Sam steps out of the wall she is covered in slimy goo. For Amanda Tapping, that must have been a very cold and ucky scene to film.

With the changes to the SGC staff and the Antarctic station, it is time to find the Lost City. But that is a different series - Stargate Atlantis.

This is a great episode, best watched as a movie.

Reviewed by Romana Drew August 2021.










Daniel on the Rampage Chilly World

Lockdown




Season 8, Episode 3

Directed by William Waring. Written by Joseph Mallozzi & Paul Mullie

Originally aired
SciFi July 23, 2004
Sky One July 23, 2004

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Michael Shanks, and Gavin Hood .

With Alisen Down as Dr. Brightman, Aaron Pearl as Major Kearney, Arvydas Lebeliunas as Anatole Konstantinov, and Dan Shea as Sgt. Siler.

A Russian, Colonel Alexi Vaselov, is assigned to the Stargate program and asks Jack to join SG1. He collapses while talking to Daniel. Then Daniel starts shooting people.

It turns out that Anubis is in the SGC. His force shield was destroyed along with his space ship so now he must inhabit someone to do anything except float around. He hops from person to person as he attempts to go through the gate.

Vaselov is dying. His immune system is trashed because Anubis inhabited him for so long. I wonder why they didn't treat him with Tretonin. It works on Jaffa, but I don't know if it was ever tested on humans.

This is a good episode. There is lots of excitement, tension, and humor.

As the commander, Jack is much more laid back than Hammond, but no less a leader.

I don't remember if Jack's mistrust of Russians in the Stargate program eases up a little after this episode. But the ending is great.

Reviewed by Romana Drew August 24, 2021










The Plant Camulus and Jack

Zero Hour




Season 8, Episode 4

Directed by Peter F. Woeste. Written by Robert C. Cooper

Originally aired
SciFi July 30, 2004
Sky One July 30, 2004

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Michael Shanks.

With David Kaufman as Mark Gilmor, Cliff Simon as Ba'al, Bill Dow as Dr. Bill Lee, Eric Breker as Colonel Reynolds, Steve Bacic as Camulus, Gary Jones as Sgt. Walter Harriman, Colin Cunningham as Major Paul Davis, Dan Shea as Sgt. Siler, and Michael Ryan as John Prior.

SG 8 brings an alien plant into the SGC. Jack must make decisions on bunting and buffet menus. Without Jack's consent, Mark Gilmor becomes his personal assistant. And delegates from Amrans can't agree on anything.

SG1 and SG3 go to a planet held by Anubis to find alien technology. SG1 Disappears. An Al'kesh flies by, so SG3 thinks they have been kidnapped.

The alien plant takes over the SGC causing all kinds of technical problems.

Baal gates in as a hologram demanding ransom for SG1.

So many things happen so quickly in this episode that if you look away, you might miss something important. Both Baal and Camulus play their parts as arrogant, manipulative liars to perfection.

I wonder what happened to the ZPM that Camulus sabotaged? Jack didn't give it to Camulus. What did he do with it? Since it has the potential to blow up the entire solar system, simply storing it someplace doesn't seem all that wise. It would be nice if they chucked it into a far distant black hole.

Reviewed by Romana Drew September 2, 2021.










Dr. Carmichael The Kull Warrior

Avatar




Season 8, Episode 6

Directed by Martin Wood. Written by Damian Kindler

Originally aired
SciFi August 13, 2004
Sky One August 13, 2004

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, and Michael Shanks.

With Bill Dow as Dr. Bill Lee, Andrew Airlie as Dr. Carmichael, Gary Jones as Sgt. Walter Harriman, Dan Shea as Sgt. Siler, and Dan Payne as Kull Warrior.

Dr. Lee's training simulation traps Teal'c inside a virtual world where he must defeat a Kull warrior. Just as he is about to succeed, the game puts more obstacles in his way.

Sam, Dr. Lee, and Dr. Carmichael try to keep Teal'c alive while the game saps his strength. The only way out of the game is to defeat the warrior or give up. Teal'c is unable to do either.

This story is simple, Teal'c chases a Kull warrior around the SGC as it kills everyone. The writing and directing are good enough to keep this interesting even though it is repetitive.

Of course, the device can't be disconnected because that might kill Teal'c. I rather wish there was some other reason why it can't be disconnected. This one doesn't make sense, and it is overused.

And I do miss Teryl Rothery as Dr. Janet Fraiser. I wish they hadn't killed her off.

Reviewed by Romana Drew September 4, 2021.










Krysta and Teal'c Sam and Pete

Affinity




Season 8, Episode 7

Directed by Peter DeLuise. Written by Peter DeLuise

Originally aired
SciFi August 20, 2004
Sky One August 20, 2004

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, and Michael Shanks.

With David DeLuise as Pete Shanahan, Erica Durance as Krista James, Derek Hamilton as Doug McNair, Gary Jones as Sgt. Walter Harriman, Lucas Wolf as Jennings, Peter Bryant as Hoskins, Michael J Rogers as Col. Richard Kendrick, Christopher Attadia as Eric, and Benita Ha as Brooks.

Teal'c has an apartment in a middle-class neighborhood. He teaches the local thugs a lesson or two, then helps his neighbor, Krista defend herself against an abusive boyfriend. Colonel Richard Kendrick wants Teal'c back at the SGC.

Pete proposes to Sam.

What starts out as a simple exploration of how Teal'c might integrate into society turns out to be much more exciting and complex. Krista's boyfriend is killed. Then Daniel and Krista are kidnapped by The Trust.

This is the first real introduction to The Trust and its nefarious ways. But it won't be the last time we see these villains.

Krista is played by Erica Durance, who also played Lois Lane in Smallville.

This episode starts out slow and gentle but builds to a fast and exciting conclusion. It is quite well done with some unexpected plot twists.

Reviewed by Romana Drew September 13, 2021.










Sam and the almost Asgard Alec Colson

Covenant




Season 8, Episode 8

Directed by Martin Wood. Written by Story by Ron Wilkerson

Originally aired
SciFi August 27, 2004
Sky One August 27, 2004

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, and Michael Shanks.

With Charles Shaughnessy as Alec Colson, Tom O'Brien as Brian Vogler, Kendall Cross as Julia Donovan, and Chris Shields as Capt. Mike Shefield.

Alec Colson has more money than common sense. He also has evidence of the Prometheus and the battle with Anubis. He challenges the governments to come clean, or he will prove the existence of the alien threat.

No one takes him too seriously until he parades an Asgard around the stage.

No matter what Sam does, Coloson just won't change his mind. But the more he insists on bringing this secret to the world, the worse things get. Someone is willing to do anything to stop him, but it isn't the government.

This is the story of the downfall of a wealthy, powerful man. It is unclear what Colson has to gain by telling the world of aliens. He built a large, powerful corporation. Nice, idealistic people seldom succeed at that. It takes drive, persistence, and a bit of ruthlessness. Colson has the persistence but not the common sense to cut his losses while he still can.

Although Colson is a bit of a jerk, and this isn't the happiest of episodes, it works fine.

Reviewed by Romana Drew September 15, 2021.










Moloc and Ishta Kar'yn and Rya'c before Bra'tac

Sacrifices




Season 8, Episode 9

Directed by Andy Mikita. Written by Christopher Judge

Originally aired
SciFi September 10, 2004
Sky One September 10, 2004

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, and Michael Shanks.

With Jolene Blalock as Ishta, Tony Amendola as Master Bra'tac, Neil Denis as Rya'c, Mercedes de la Zerda as Kar'yn, Royston Innes as Moloc, Gary Jones as Sgt. Walter Harriman, Jeff Judge as Aron, Dan Payne as Jaffa, and Dan Shea as Sgt. Siler,

Hak'tyl, Ishta's planet, has been compromised. Rya'c is to be married to Kar'yn, one of Ishta's clan. Sam finds Ishta's people a new planet. A meeting of loyal Jaffa is called, and Moloc kills almost everyone except Teal'c, Ishta, and a Jaffa named Aron.

The chase is on. Moloc wants Teal'c and Ishta dead. Ishta wants Moloc dead. Rya'c wants to get married. Teal'c wants the wedding stopped.

This is another episode by Christopher Judge about Ishta and the difficulties of female Jaffa. His younger brother, Jeff Judge, plays Aron a loyal Jaffa. As an aside, Jeff Judge is Erica Durance's brother-in-law. Hollywood is infamous for nepotism, even when filming in Canada.

This is a good episode with a very satisfying ending.

Reviewed by Romana Drew September 19, 2021.










The Symbiont Poison Zara Being Poisoned

Endgame




Season 8, Episode 10

Directed by Peter DeLuise. Written by Joseph Mallozzi & Paul Mullie.

Originally aired
SciFi September 17, 2004
Sky One September 17, 2004

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, and Michael Shanks.

With Brandy Ledford as Zarin, Jonathan Holmes as Dr. Bricksdale, Mark Gibbon as M'zel, Rob Lee as Colonel Pierce, Gary Jones as Sgt. Walter Harriman, Peter Bryant as Hoskins, Lucas Wolf as Jennings, Benita Ha as Brooks, Scott Owen as Sgt. Mackenzie, and Barclay Hope as Colonel Lionel Pendergast.

In the middle of the night, the Stargate disappears. From the Alpha site, Teal'c gates to P4S-161 to borrow a Jaffa Tel'tak to see why no one can gate to Earth. He finds the Jaffa dead, everyone everywhere.

Teal'c and M'zel, another Jaffa, believe the Tok'ra used the symbiont poison on P4S-161. They gate to a planet to question Zaran, a Tok'ra posing as a System Lord. A rocket flies through the Stargate and explodes. Everyone on that planet dies except Teal'c, which confirms that the symbiont poison is the culprit, and the Tok'ra are not responsible.

Who stole the Stargate? How did they do it? Who would kill thousands of Jaffa just to do in a System Lord?

This is a well-crafted episode. The opening scene with Walter and a technician is excellent.

Zaran's costume must have been designed by a man.

When Sam and Daniel are captured, why is Sam tied up, but Daniel isn't? Of course, it makes the ensuing fight a little more plausible.

This is another episode that tells us a little more about the Trust.

Reviewed by Romana Drew September 28, 2021.










Sam and Replicator Sam Replicator Sam and Fifth

Gemini




Season 8, Episode 11

Directed by William Waring. Written by Peter DeLuise

Originally aired
SciFi January 21, 2005
Sky One December 14, 2004

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, and Michael Shanks.

With G. Patrick Currie as Fifth, Gary Jones as Sgt. Walter Harriman, Jason Emanuel as Tech Sergeant, and Dan Shea as Sgt. Siler.

The Stargate activates, and Sam's old IDC code is received. Surprise, it's Replicator Sam asking to be killed.

Instead, she is interrogated. She says Fifth has made the replicators immune to the weapon Jack designed a while back. She wants the replicators destroyed and offers to help design a new weapon. Yeah, right.

Amanda Tapping does an excellent job of being both Sam and Replicator Sam. The characters have almost identical behavior, but not quite. It is interesting to watch the portrayal.

Throughout the episode, it is obvious that Replicator Sam is up to something, but just what is a bit of a surprise and isn't clear until the end. She is as clever as Sam and has the replicator urge to take over the entire universe. This can't be good.

The episode, however, is excellent.

Reviewed by Romana Drew September 2021










Daniel and Vala Hammond, Walter and the Gang

Prometheus Unbound




Season 8, Episode 12

Directed by Andy Mikita. Written by Damian Kindler

Originally aired
SciFi January 28, 2005
Sky One December 21, 2004

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, and Michael Shanks.

With Claudia Black as Vala Mal Doran, Don S. Davis as Lieutenant General George Hammond, Ellie Harvie as Dr. Lindsey Novak, Gary Jones as Sgt. Walter Harriman, Eric Breker as Colonel Reynolds, Morris Chapdelaine as Tenat, and Dan Payne as Kull Warrior,

General Hammond is back. He takes Daniel and Walter against Jack's wishes and the Prometheus to find Atlantis. Instead, he finds Vala Mal Doran. The Prometheus will never be the same.

The Prometheus responds to a human distress call. Instead of a human, they find a Kull Warrior using a Zat'nik'tel! After he transports everyone on board a disabled Al'kesh, he steals the Prometheus.

It is great to see Hammond again, especially commanding spaceships in battle. The same is true for seeing Walter in action instead of just sitting at the gate controls. But the best scenes are Daniel and Vala.

Ellie Harvie is very believable Dr. Lindsey Novak, hiccups and all. Female characters often have too much makeup. Dr. Novak looks like a real, normal person. I find that refreshing.

It is interesting to note that the Kull Warrior is played by Dan Payne who normally plays Kull Warriors. Which won't make much sense to those who haven't watched the episode.

Reviewed by Romana Drew September 2021.










King Arkhan The First Maybourne and Trelak

It's Good to Be King




Season 8, Episode 13

Directed by William Gereghty. Story by Michael Greenburg, Peter DeLuise, Joseph Mallozzi, and Paul Mullie. Teleplay by Joseph Mallozzi and Paul Mullie

Originally aired
SciFi February 4, 2005
Sky One January 4, 2005

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, and Michael Shanks.

With Wayne Brady as Trelak, Tom McBeath as Harry' King Arkhan The First' Maybourne, and Nancy Sorel as Garan.

A System Lord is about to enslave the world where Harry Maybourne now lives. So it's SG1 to the rescue.

Maybourne has a new persona as King Arkhan the First, which suits him just fine. Thanks to a stone with the future history of this world, everyone knows the Goa'uld are coming, and that SG1 defeats them.

It is great the see Harry again. Although, Maybourne is often Jack's adversary and on the wrong side of the law, he is never evil. Here he is, maybe not an upstanding citizen, but at least a successful leader, improving the lives of his people.

While trying to avoid the Goa'uld, SG1 finds a Puddle Jumper that can travel in time. It appears to be the same one used in the Atlantis episode Before I Sleep. And it isn't the last time we'll see this Puddle Jumper.

The instrumentalists on the planet play the McGyver theme song when Jack walks through the gate.

This episode is a little confusing in places, and it's hard to believe that a puddle jumper can take out a Ha'tak, but it is fun to watch. It is also good to see Harry Maybourne care about more than just himself.

Reviewed by Romana Drew October 6, 2021.










Daniel and Goa'uld Kinsey Captain Daria Voronkova

Full Alert




Season 8, Episode 14

Directed by Andy Mikita. Written by Joseph Mallozzi & Paul Mullie

Originally aired:
SciFi February 11, 2005
Sky One January 11, 2005

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, and Michael Shanks.

With Francoise Robertson as Captain Daria Voronkova, Garry Chalk as Colonel Chekov, Gary Jones as Sgt. Walter Harriman, Ronny Cox as Robert Kinsey, Lucas Wolf as Jennings, Barclay Hope as Colonel Lionel Pendergast, Chelah Horsdal as Lt. Womack, Mike Dopud as Colonel Chernovshev, and Joey Aresco as Mr. Parker.

When Kinsey offers to help defeat the Trust, SG1 sends him to a meeting with a tracking device in his belt. That might have worked if the Trust hadn't turned him into a Goa'uld.

Russians learn about Kinsey and assume the Goa'uld have taken over the US government. Both the Russian and US militaries prepare for war.

This is a fine end to Kinsey's despicable life.

Many people are not what they seem on the surface. The Trust has been taken over, by the Goa'uld, and they are on Earth. This can't be good.

This is an interesting episode that sets up the story arch for other Trust and eventually Baal episodes.

It feels as if the producers are fishing around for different bad guys to conquer.

Reviewed by Romana Drew October 13, 2021.










Joe and the Stone Joe and his Ever Suffering Wife

Citizen Joe




Season 8, Episode 15

Directed by Andy Mikita. Written by Story by Robert C. Cooper

Originally aired:
SciFi February 18, 2005
Sky One January 18, 2005

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, and Michael Shanks.

With Dan Castellaneta as Joe Spencer, Deborah Theaker as Charlene Spencer, Eric Keenleyside as Fred, Louis Chirillo as Bert Simmons, Chad Krowchuk as Gordie Lowe, and Alex Ferris as Andy Spencer.



Seven years ago, Joe Spenser, a barber from Indiana, brought a carved stone at a yard sale. Since then, he has had visions of SG1' adventures as seen through Jack's eyes. He believes these events are real. His life is in tatters, and his marriage is shot. He finally tracks down Jack.

This is one of the best excuses for flashbacks that I have ever watched. Joe is gullible and charming. Instead of assuming the stone is somehow hallucinogenic and discarding it or relegating the visions to fantasy, he becomes addicted to the lives of SG1 as seen through the eyes of Jack.

He even cries when Daniel dies.

It takes two stones for this kind of communication. They will be used in later episodes. As an aside, Dan Castellaneta, who plays Joe, is the voice of Homer Simpson.

This is a great episode.

Reviewed by Romana Drew October 15, 2021.










The Battle for the Replicators Ball in All his Conceited Glory And Daniel Dies Again The Weapon on Dakara

Reckoning: Part 1 and 2




Season 8, Episode 16

Directed by Peter DeLuise. Written by Damian Kindler

Originally aired
SciFi February 25, 2005
Sky One January 25, 2005

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, and Michael Shanks.

With Tony Amendola as Master Bra'tac, Carmen Argenziano as Jacob Carter / Selmak, Cliff Simon as Ba'al, Gary Jones as Sgt. Walter Harriman, Samantha Kaine as Goa'uld Lieutenant, Mel Harris as Oma Desala, Isaac Hayes as Tolok, Jeff Judge as Aron, Dean Aylesworth as Old Anubis, Rik Kiviaho as New Anubis, Vince Crestejo as Yu-huang Shang Ti, Kevan Ohtsji as Yu's First Prime, Dan Shea as Sgt. Siler, and Emy Aneke as Baal's Jaffa.

Replicator Sam kills Lord Yu, takes over his ships, and kidnaps Daniel. Teal'c and Bra'tac fight Baal for control of Dakara. Jacob/Selmak visit the SGC to tell Jack that the replicators are on the verge of defeating the Goa'uld.

So, now that everything has gone to hell, let the story begin.

While Teal'c and Bra'tac organize the fight for Dakara and the Goa'uld fight the replicators. Replicator Sam has her hand inside Daniel's head, searching for info on the Ancients.

Human Sam is beamed aboard Thor's ship to help modify the anti-replicator weapon to work on the new version of replicators. Turns out, they can adapt as soon as it is used once. To defeat the Replicators, they must all be hit simultaneously, all over the galaxy.

There is a superweapon on Dakara that can do just that. Anubis wants it so he can destroy all life in the galaxy and start over to his liking.

And Daniel dies again.

This and the next episode tie up many loose ends and change the bad guy scene in major ways. Both episodes are well-written, well-paced, and exciting. They are also a bit complicated, with people in different places facing different challenges. I strongly suggest watching them back to back or on consecutive days.

Reviewed by Romana Drew September 18, 2021.










Sam and Pete The Diner

Threads




Season 8, Episode 18

Directed by Andy Mikita. Written by Teleplay by Robert C. Cooper

Originally aired
SciFi March 11, 2005
Sky One February 8, 2005

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, and Michael Shanks.

With Carmen Argenziano as Jacob Carter / Selmak, Tony Amendola as Master Bra'tac, David DeLuise as Pete Shanahan, Clare Carey as Kerry Johnson, Gary Jones as Sgt. Walter Harriman, Cliff Simon as Ba'al, Isaac Hayes as Tolok, Mel Harris as Oma Desala, George Dzundza as Jim / Anubis, and Rik Kiviaho as Anubis.

Daniel is in a diner with Oma. Selmak/Jacob are dying. Sam has doubts about her relationship with Pete.

After the last two episodes, this is a quiet interlude. The big question is not why everyone in the Diner except Oma ignores Daniel. Of course, they are all ascended. They have no interest in Daniel until he either ascends or dies. Except for one obnoxious man, Jim.

It takes Daniel a while to put it all together.

This episode was originally broadcast as a 63-minute special. I watched the Director's Cut, which is only 44 minutes.

A few spoilers here:

With the Replicators gone, the Jaffa free, the Goa'uld defeated, Anubis gone, Sam free of romantic entanglements, and a weapon that can destroy almost anything anywhere, the series is now open for change.

Reviewed by Romana Drew October 22, 2021.










Daniel and Sam Jack and the Jumper

Moebius: Part 1




Season 8, Episode 19

Directed by Peter DeLuise. Story by Joseph Mallozzi, Paul Mullie, Brad Wright and Robert C. Cooper. Teleplay by Robert C. Cooper

Originally aired
SciFi March 18, 2005
Sky One February 15, 2005

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, and Michael Shanks.

With David Hewlett as Dr. Rodney McKay, Don S. Davis as Brigadier General George Hammond, Robert Wisden as Major Bert Samuels, Colin Cunningham as Major Paul Davis, David Lewis as Cameron Balinsky, James Purcell as Dr. Hersfield, Alessandro Juliani as Katep, Georgia Craig as Sabrina Gosling, Jay Williams as Ra, Benjamin Easterday as Ra's Jaffa Commander, and Neil Schell as Mr. Crandall.

Catherine Langford wills her entire collection of artifacts relating to the Stargate to Daniel. In it, he finds a book with the location of a ZPM. Or rather, where the ZPM was in 3,000 BC.

The Wraith are attacking Atlantis. The new Daedalus can get to Atlantis, but it will take too long. If they had a ZPM, they could send reinforcements through the Stargate. Since they have a time-traveling Puddle Jumper, off they go to 3,000 BC, with the admonishment not to change the timeline.

Back to the present, Daniel teaches immigrants to speak English. Sam proofreads scientific papers. Jack lives on a dilapidated boat. Teal'c is First Prime to Apophis. General Hammond commands the Cheyanne Mountain facility but doesn't have a clue what a Stargate is. Oops!

A team of Archeologists discovers a canopic jar with a video camera sealed inside. It has a recording made by SG1 back in ancient Egypt.

Moebius parts one and two go around and around in time as SG1 tries to straighten out the mess they made, get the ZPM, and save Atlantis.

It is great to see Richard Dean Anderson, Amanda Tapping, and Michael Shanks play their characters with different personalities. It is also good to see Ra again. The Rodney McKay in Atlantis is considerably softer and less of an ass than the Rodney in this episode.

This is a good episode, well worth watching.

Reviewed by Romana Drew October 30, 2021.










Sam and Jack - Finally Hammond and Rodney

Moebius: Part 2




Season 8, Episode 20

Directed by Peter DeLuise. Story by Joseph Mallozzi, Paul Mullie, Brad Wright and Robert C. Cooper. Teleplay by Robert C. Cooper

Originally aired
SciFi March 25, 2005
Sky One February 22, 2005

Starring Richard Dean Anderson, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, and Michael Shanks.

With David Hewlett as Dr. Rodney McKay, Don S. Davis as Brigadier General George Hammond, Peter Williams as Apophis, Alessandro Juliani as Katep, Jay Acovone as Major Charles Kawalsky, and Benjamin Easterday as Ra's Jaffa Commander.

First, they retrieve the time-traveling Puddle Jumper from present-day Egypt and the Stargate from Antarctica (in this timeline, Ra took the one from Egypt in 3,000 BC). Then they recruit Jack to fly the Puddle Jumper through the gate to Chulak and pick up Teal'c.

Of course, Apophis gets involved, killing almost everyone. Sam, Jack, and Teal'c make it to the Jumper. About to be destroyed by Death Gliders, they time jump back to Egypt, 3,000 BC. There they meet Daniel, the original Daniel.

The time on Chulak is pretty predictable, Apophis being his same old nasty self. The time in ancient Egypt is interesting. Jack and Sam finally get together in a most charming way.

This is the end of season 8, the end of all of the major villains that have plagued Earth for the past eight years. It also portends significant changes in Stargate Command during the next season.

Reviewed by Romana Drew November 1, 2021.
Baal and the Ori
Season 9










Vala Merlin Cameron

Avalon: Part 1




Season 1 Episode 1

Directed by Mikita. Written by Teleplay by Robert C. Cooper

Excerpts. Written by Robert C. Cooper & Brad Wright

Originally aired July 15, 2005

Starring Ben Browder as Cameron Mitchell, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Beau Bridges as Major General Henry Landry, and Michael Shanks.

With Claudia Black as Vala Mal Doran, Obi Ndefo as Rak'nor, Gary Jones as Chief Mst Sgt. Walter Harriman, Bill Dow as Dr. Bill Lee, Matthew Walker as Merlin, and Richard Dean Anderson as Major General Jack O'Neill.

Jack has retired. His replacement, Major General Henry Landry, is now in command. Sam is at Area 51. Teal's is on Chulak, trying to organize the Jaffa. Daniel is waiting for his ride to Atlantis.

Lt. Colonel Cameron Mitchell is now the leader of SG1. He wants Sam, Teal'c, and Daniel on his team, but they all refuse. Then Vala Mal Doran walks through the Stargate.

She claims to have knowledge of ancient treasures hidden on Earth. She just needs Daniel to translate a tablet with the location of the treasure. She slaps a bracelet on his wrist then puts an identical one on hers. If they get separated, both get sick and could die, forcing Daniel to take her with him on the treasure hunt.

This is a great episode. It has hidden caves, puzzles, falling ceilings. It even has a sword in a stone and Merlin.

The interaction between Vala and Daniel is a wonderful love-hate relationship. In continues to evolve throughout the season.

Be forewarned, it is a real cliffhanger.

Cameron was at the battle over Antarctica and was severely injured. There are quite a few flashbacks of his escapades and his recovery. They give insight into his character and aren't so long as to be distracting.

Reviewed by Romana Drew November 2, 2021.










Daniel Vala The Ori Prior

Avalon: Part 2




Season 1 Episode 2

Directed by Mikita. Written by Robert C. Cooper

Originally aired July 22, 2005

Starring Ben Browder, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Beau Bridges, Michael Shanks.

With Claudia Black as Vala Mal Doran, Obi Ndefo as Rak'nor, Bill Dow as Dr. Bill Lee, April Telek as Sallis, Mark Houghton as Ori Prior, Stephen Park as Harrid, Lexa Doig as Dr. Carolyn Lam, Paul Moniz de Sa as Fannis, Martin Christopher as Lt. Kevin Marks, Greg Anderson as Ori Administrator, and Brahm Taylor as Villager.

Cameron and team bring a device back from the treasure caves. The stones that connected Jack and Joe together for seven years fit perfectly into holes in the device.

Believing it to be a communications device of some sort, Daniel wants to be the first to try it. Vala grabs the second stone. If it is a transport device, rather than a communications device, Vala needs to go with Daniel, or the bracelets will kill them both.

Their bodies don't go anywhere except to the floor unconscious. Their minds end up in the bodies of Harrid and Sallis, members of a pre-industrial society who worship the Ori.

Not knowing where they are or how this society works, it isn't long before they are in serious trouble. It isn't long before they meet a Prior of the Ori and experience the immense power he controls.

The Ori are one of the new villains of the new season. Although on the surface, they are quite different from the Goa'uld, they are still posing as false Gods and enslaving people.

The previous episode was lots of fun. This one is much more serious. And it's not the end of the story.

Reviewed by Romana Drew November 3, 2021.










The Doci - Gloing Eyes and All Daniel and Vala

Origin




Season 9 Episode 3

Directed by Brad Turner. Written by Robert C. Cooper

Originally aired July 29, 2005

Starring Ben Browder, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Beau Bridges, Claudia Black, and Michael Shanks.

With Larry Cedar as Ori Prior, Gary Jones as Chief Mst Sgt. Walter Harriman, Bill Dow as Dr. Bill Lee, Mark Houghton as Ori Prior, April Telek as Sallis, Stephen Park as Harrid, Richard Dean Anderson as Major General Jack O'Neill, Julian Sands as The Doci, Lexa Doig as Dr. Carolyn Lam, Louis Gossett Jr. as Gerak, Paul Moniz de Sa as Fannis, Greg Anderson as Ori Administrator, Gardiner Millar as Yat'Yir, and Penelope Corrin as Dr. Lindsay.

Daniel's and Vala's minds are still in the Sallis' and Harrid's bodies. They are taken by an Ori Prior to the City of the Gods on the Plains of Celestis, where Daniel meets the Doci or spokesperson for the Ori.

Closer to home, Priors start popping up on planets, insisting that the population worship them or die. One even makes it to Stargate Command.

This is an exciting but somewhat disturbing episode. It sets the Ori up as ruthless and powerful adversaries. Although Daniel and Vala escape death, Sallis and Harrid are not so fortunate.

Cameron is settling nicely into his role as the head of SG1, even though he doesn't actually have a team yet.

Reviewed by Romana Drew November 15, 2021.










Tenat - a Member of th Lucien Alliance Arlos Kadawam

The Ties That Bind




Season 9 Episode 4

Directed by William Waring. Written by Joseph Mallozzi & Paul Mullie

Originally aired August 5, 2005

Starring Ben Browder, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Beau Bridges, Claudia Black and Michael Shanks.

With Bruce Gray as Sen. Fisher, Gary Jones as Chief Mst Sgt. Walter Harriman, Bill Dow as Dr. Bill Lee, Wallace Shawn as Arlos, Lexa Doig as Dr. Carolyn Lam, Malcolm Scott as Caius, Michael P. Northey as Inago, Morris Chapdelaine as Tenat, Eileen Pedde as Major Gibson, Darren Moore as Vosh, and Geoff Redknap as Jup.

Now that Vala has released the Kor mak bracelets that bound her and Daniel together, she is free to leave Earth. Daniel sees her off only to pass out a few minutes later. With Vala back in Stargate Command, they both recover.

They pay a visit to Arlos Kadawam, a scientist and former lover, who may be able to sever the link. Of course, he has a price. He wants the necklace that Vala stole. Vala sold the necklace some time ago. So, an intragalactic scavenger search begins.

This episode is full of unexpected plot twists and humor.

There is a great scene where Daniel testifies before the Senate Appropriations Committee. Of course, Vala has to travel with him. She has her own take on the proceedings. The scene is great, but, in reality, Vala would not be allowed inside the chamber.

This episode also introduces the Lucien Alliance, a coalition of bad guys filling the gaps left by the demise of the Goa'uld.

Wallace Shawn, who plays Arlos in this episode, also played the Grand Nagus on Star Trek DS9.

At this point SG1 consists of Cameron, Daniel, and Vala.

Reviewed by Romana Drew November 17, 2021.










Vala as Quetesh The Prior

The Powers That Be




Season 9 Episode 5

Directed by William Waring. Written by Martin Gero

Originally aired August 12, 2005

Starring Ben Browder, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Beau Bridges, Claudia Black andMichael Shanks.

With Camyar Chai as Azdak, Pablo Coffey as Vachna, Gary Jones as Chief Mst Sgt. Walter Harriman, Lexa Doig as Dr. Carolyn Lam, Greg Anderson as Ori Prior, Chad Hershler as Villager, Nicola Correia-Damude as Play Vala, as Matt David Johnson as Play Warrior.

When Vala learns that a Prior has visited P8X-412, she insists on going to help the people. Cameron, Daniel, and Teal'c accompany her. Once there, she changes clothes and appears before the people as the Goa'uld Quetesh.

Her efforts to make the villagers understand that both the Ori and the Goa'uld are false gods and that she is just a person land her in jail, scheduled for execution. To make things worse, the prior curses the village with a deadly plague.

Apparently Vala continued to rule over these people even after Quetesh was removed. She wasn't evil, but she wasn't the most benevolent of rulers either. But she does everything she can with the healing device to cure the people and to stop the Ori.

This episode is often intense and frustrating. There just isn't any way to get the better of the Prior. It does develop the Vala character. Under all the scheming bravado, she really does care about the villagers.

Reviewed by Romana Drew November 19, 2021.










The Prior Keeping the Stargate Open Nerus

Beachhead




Season 9 Episode 6

Directed by Brad Turner. Written by Brad Wright

Originally aired August 19, 2005

Starring Ben Browder, Amanda Tapping, Christopher Judge, Beau Bridges, Claudia Black, and Michael Shanks.

With Barclay Hope as Colonel Lionel Pendergast, Gary Jones as Chief Mst Sgt. Walter Harriman, Maury Chaykin as Nerus, Louis Gossett Jr. as Gerak, Ian Butcher as Ori Prior, Martin Christopher as Lt. Marks, Donald Adams as Latal, Eileen Barrett as Birra, and Dan Shea as Sgt. Siler.

A Prior comes to Kallana, a Jaffa planet. He keeps the Stargate open and surrounds the Stargate with a forcefield.

A Goa'uld named Nerus, offers to help. He claims to be the one who told Baal how to dial all the gates at once to defeat the Replicators.

Sam returns to help ring a Naquadria enhanced nuclear warhead into the forcefield. It should be able destroy both the gate and the forcefield. Instead of doing any damage, it gives the field the energy to engulf the entire planet. Then the Ori ships start pouring out.

Nerus is an interesting character. Of course, he can't be trusted, but the level of his deception isn't obvious until the end. However, his comeuppance is quite satisfying.

While everyone else is at a loss, Vala risks her life to stop the Ori.

This is the end of Vala for a few episodes. But Sam is back on the team.

Reviewed by Romana Drew November 21, 2021.